Silla

Silla or Shilla (57 BCE[note 1] – 935 CE) (Korean: 신라; Hanja: 新羅; RR: Silla Korean pronunciation: [ɕiɭ.ɭa]) was a Korean kingdom located on the southern and central parts of the Korean Peninsula. Silla, along with Baekje and Goguryeo, formed the Three Kingdoms of Korea.

Silla
신라 (新羅)
57 BCE – 935 CE
Pre-Later Silla at its height in 576
CapitalGyeongju (Geumseong, then Seorabeol)
Common languagesOld Korean
Classical Chinese[1]
Religion
Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shamanism
GovernmentMonarchy
King 
 57 BCE – 4 CE
Hyeokgeose (first)
 540–576
Jinheung
 654–661
Muyeol
 661–681
Munmu
 681–692
Sinmun
 927–935
Gyeongsun (last)
History 
 Establishment
57 BCE
 Introduction of Buddhism
530
 Campaigns of King Jinheung
551–585
668-676
668–935
 Handover to the Goryeo
935 CE
Population
 7th century[2]
894,680
 8th century[2]
2,000,000
Preceded by
Succeeded by
Jinhan confederacy
Gojoseon
Goryeo
Today part ofSouth Korea
North Korea
Silla
Hunminjeongeum
Hanja
Revised RomanizationSilla
McCune–ReischauerSilla

Founded by Hyeokgeose of Silla, of the Park family, the Korean[3] dynasty was ruled by the Gyeongju Gim (Kim) (김, 金) clan for 586 years, the Miryang Bak (Park) (박, 朴) clan for 232 years and the Wolseong Seok (석, 昔) clan for 172 years. It began as a chiefdom in the Samhan confederacies, once allied with Sui China and then Tang China, until it eventually conquered the other two kingdoms, Baekje in 660 and Goguryeo in 668. Thereafter, Later Silla occupied most of the Korean Peninsula, while the northern part re-emerged as Balhae, a successor-state of Goguryeo. After nearly 1,000 years of rule, Silla fragmented into the brief Later Three Kingdoms of Silla, Later Baekje, and Taebong, handing over power to Goryeo in 935.[4]