Solomon Dalung


Solomon Selcap Dalung (born 26 September 1964) is a Nigerian Politician, Lawyer and Academic. He was made the Minister of Youth and Sports by President Muhammadu Buhari in November 2015 and his tenure ended in May 2019.[1][2] He has served in the Nigerian Prisons Service, the University of Jos as a lecturer and as Chairman of Langtang South Local Government in Plateau State.[3]

Barr

Solomon Dalung
Minister of Youth & Sports
In office
2015–2019
Succeeded bySunday Dare
Personal details
Born
Solomon Selcap Dalung

(1964-09-26) September 26, 1964 (age 56)
NationalityNigerian
Political partyAll Progressives Congress
EducationUniversity of Jos
OccupationLawyer, Politician

Early life and education


Solomon Dalung was born on the 26th of September 1964 in Sabo Gida, Plateau State.[4] He had his primary school education at the Local Education Authority Primary School, Sabon Gida in Langtang South Local Government Area of Plateau State from 1971 to 1977. He then proceeded to Government College Keffi, Nassarawa State for his secondary school education.[5] After his secondary education, he proceeded to the University of Jos where he graduated with LLB degree in 2000 and was called into the Nigerian Bar in 2001 at the Nigerian Law School, Abuja Campus. He obtained a Master of Laws (LLM) degree from the University of Jos in 2007 while he was a lecturer at the same Institution.[6]

Career


Nigerian Prisons Service career

Barr. Dalung joined the Nigerian Prisons Service as a Prison Assistant in 1982 where he rose to the rank of Assistant Inspector of Prisons.[7] In 1991, while still in the Prisons Service, he enrolled to the Law Program of the University of Jos to obtain a Bachelor of Laws degree which he obtained in the year 2000. Following his training as an attorney at the University of Jos and the Nigerian Law School, he was moved to the Legal Department at Prisons Headquarters Abuja in 2004 where he served as Legal Officer II but he retired the same year from the Prisons Services.[8]

Academic career

In 2004, after his retirement from the Nigerian Prisons Service, he took up an appointment as a lecturer with the Law Faculty of the University of Jos.[9]

Political career

He started his political Career as a Personal Assistant to Chief Solomon Lar, CON, when Lar was appointed as Adviser Emeritus to President Olusegun Obasanjo until 2003.[10] In 2007, he was appointed the Chairman of Langtang South Local Government Area up till May 2008. In his position as Local Government Chairman, he served as the Plateau State Deputy Chairman of the Association of Local Government Chairmen of Nigeria (ALGON) and later as the Chairman of the Association. After his tenure as Local Government Chairman, he made an attempt at representing Langtang North and South at the National Assembly but lost. He was a member of the Northern Elders Forum (NEF) and was also member of President Muhammadu Buhari’s Transitional Committee.[11] His tenure ends as the minister of youth and sport in May 2019.[12]

Personal life


Solomon Dalung is married with children. He lost his first wife in 2017.[13] He is a Christian.[14][15]

Awards and recognitions


Solomon Dalung alongside Akinwunmi Ambode, Willie Obiano, Lai Mohammed, Chioma Ajunwa-Opara, Herbert Wigwe Patrick Ifeanyi Ubah were shortlisted to be honoured at the second edition of the "Bunubunu Sports and Culture Award" on Saturday, February 2, 2019.[16] In 2018, he received an award of All Times at the "Independence Hero’s Award" on Saturday, Oct. 13 in Calabar.[17]

References


  1. Editor (13 October 2018). "Dalung set to be honoured at Independence Hero's Award in Calabar". News Agency of Nigeria. Retrieved 28 January 2019.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  2. Ifetoye, Samuel (4 January 2019). "Dalung vows to fix National Stadium Lagos this year". Guardian. Retrieved 28 January 2019.
  3. Adekunle (11 October 2015). "Ministerial nominee, Solomon DALUNG's CV". Vanguard Nigeria. Retrieved 12 January 2019.
  4. Inyang, Ifreke (12 November 2015). "8 things you didn't know about new Sports Minister, Solomon Dalong". Daily Post. Retrieved 28 January 2019.
  5. Esene, Isime (7 January 2017). "PROFILE: Is Solomon Dalung the worst minister ever liveth?". YNaija. Retrieved 28 January 2019.
  6. Adekunle (11 October 2015). "Ministerial nominee, Solomon DALUNG's CV". Vanguard Nigeria. Retrieved 12 January 2019.
  7. "Ministerial nominee, Solomon DALUNG's CV". Vanguard News. 2015-10-11. Retrieved 2020-05-30.
  8. Adekunle (11 October 2015). "Ministerial nominee, Solomon DALUNG's CV". Vanguard Nigeria. Retrieved 12 January 2019.
  9. Adekunle (11 October 2015). "Ministerial nominee, Solomon DALUNG's CV". Vanguard Nigeria. Retrieved 12 January 2019.
  10. "Ministerial nominee, Solomon DALUNG's CV". Vanguard News. 2015-10-11. Retrieved 2020-05-30.
  11. Inyang, Ifreke (12 November 2015). "8 things you didn't know about new Sports Minister, Solomon Dalong". Daily Post. Retrieved 28 January 2019.
  12. https://www.premiumtimesng.com/news/headlines/342569-18-former-ministers-who-didnt-make-buharis-new-list.html%3famp_markup=1
  13. Tony (29 January 2017). "Breaking: Wife of Minsiter of Sports, Solomon Dalung, is dead". Vanguard. Retrieved 28 January 2019.
  14. Odunayo, Adams (6 June 2017). "Nigeria's sports minister talks about converting to Islam (photos)". Legit. Retrieved 28 January 2019.
  15. Anonymous (26 June 2016). "Dalung leads Christian clerics to break fast with Islamic scholars". The News Nigeria. Retrieved 28 January 2019.
  16. Editor (23 January 2019). "Ambode, Obiano, Dalung others for Bunubunu Sports/Culture award". Guardian. Retrieved 28 January 2019.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)
  17. Editor (13 October 2018). "Dalung set to be honoured at Independence Hero's Award in Calabar". News Agency of Nigeria. Retrieved 28 January 2019.CS1 maint: extra text: authors list (link)