Somerset

Somerset (/ˈsʌmərsɪt, -sɛt/ (listen);[2] archaically Somersetshire) is a county in South West England which borders Gloucestershire and Bristol to the north, Wiltshire to the east, Dorset to the south-east and Devon to the south-west. It is bounded to the north and west by the Severn Estuary and the Bristol Channel, its coastline facing southeastern Wales. Its traditional border with Gloucestershire is the River Avon.[3] Somerset's county town is Taunton.

Somerset
Motto(s): 
Old English: Sumorsǣte ealle
(English: All The People of Somerset)
Coordinates: 51°06′N 2°54′W
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Constituent countryEngland
RegionSouth West England
EstablishedAncient
Time zoneUTC±00:00 (Greenwich Mean Time)
  Summer (DST)UTC+01:00 (British Summer Time)
Members of Parliament
Ceremonial county
Lord LieutenantAnne Maw
High SheriffMrs Mary-Clare Rodwell [1] (2020–21)
Area4,171 km2 (1,610 sq mi)
  Ranked7th of 48
Population (mid-2019 est.)965,424
  Ranked22nd of 48
Density232/km2 (600/sq mi)
Ethnicity98.5% White
Districts

Districts of Somerset
Districts
  1. South Somerset
  2. Somerset West and Taunton
  3. Sedgemoor
  4. Mendip
  5. Bath and North East Somerset (Unitary)
  6. North Somerset (Unitary)

Somerset is a rural county of rolling hills, the Blackdown Hills, Mendip Hills, Quantock Hills and Exmoor National Park, and large flat expanses of land including the Somerset Levels. There is evidence of human occupation from Paleolithic times, and of subsequent settlement by the Celts, Romans and Anglo-Saxons. The county played a significant part in Alfred the Great's rise to power, and later the English Civil War and the Monmouth Rebellion. The city of Bath is famous for its Georgian architecture and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.