IWAS World Games


The International Wheelchair and Amputee Sports (IWAS) World Games (or IWAS World Games) are a multi-sport competition for athletes with a disability, which under the former name of the International Stoke Mandeville Games were the forerunner of the Paralympic Games. The competition has been formerly known as the World Wheelchair and Amputee Games, the Stoke Mandeville Wheelchair Games, the Stoke Mandeville Games, the World Wheelchair Games, and in the 1960s and 1970s was often referred to as the Wheelchair Olympics.

The Games were originally held in 1948 by neurologist Sir Ludwig Guttmann, who organized a sporting competition involving World War II veterans with spinal cord injuries at the Stoke Mandeville Hospital rehabilitation facility in Aylesbury, England, taking place concurrently with the first post-war Summer Olympics in London. In 1952, the Netherlands joined in the event, creating the first international sports competition for the disabled. In 1960, the Ninth Stoke Mandeville Games were held in Rome, Italy, following that year's Olympic Games. These are considered to be the first Paralympic Games.[1] The 2012 Paralympic mascot Mandeville was named after Stoke Mandeville Hospital.[2]

While the Paralympic Games evolved to include athletes from all disability groups, the Stoke Mandeville games continued to be organized as a multi-sport event for wheelchair athletes. Games were held annually in Aylesbury under the direction of the International Stoke Mandeville Games Federation (ISMGF), which became the International Stoke Mandeville Wheelchair Sports Federation (ISMWSF).

In 1999, the World Wheelchair Games were held in Christchurch, New Zealand. In 2003, the Games were again held in Christchurch, and combined with a competition for amputee athletes organized by the International Sports Organization for the Disabled. In 2004, ISMWSF and ISOD merged to create the International Wheelchair and Amputee Sports Federation (IWAS). The first games held under the name IWAS World Wheelchair and Amputee Games were held in 2005 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The second IWAS Games were held in 2007 in Chinese Taipei and the third IWAS games were held in Bangalore, India in November 2009.

Games by year


Year Name of the event Host annotation
1948Stoke Mandeville Games for the Paralyzed[3] United Kingdom Stoke MandevilleJuly 28, 1948, archery competition, 16 competitors[4] (14 men, 2 women[5])
1949Stoke Mandeville Games United Kingdom Stoke Mandeville
1950Stoke Mandeville Games United Kingdom Stoke Mandeville
1951Stoke Mandeville Games United Kingdom Stoke Mandeville
19521st International Stoke Mandeville Games[6] United Kingdom Stoke MandevilleA Dutch team participated, making it an international event[4]
19532nd International Stoke Mandeville Games United Kingdom Stoke Mandeville
19543rd International Stoke Mandeville Games United Kingdom Stoke Mandeville
19554th International Stoke Mandeville Games United Kingdom Stoke Mandeville
19565th International Stoke Mandeville Games United Kingdom Stoke Mandeville
19576th International Stoke Mandeville Games United Kingdom Stoke Mandeville
19587th International Stoke Mandeville Games United Kingdom Stoke Mandeville
19598th International Stoke Mandeville Games United Kingdom Stoke Mandeville
19609th International Stoke Mandeville Games.
later known as the 1st Paralympic Games[7]
 Italy Rome
196110th International Stoke Mandeville Games
196211th International Stoke Mandeville Games
196312th International Stoke Mandeville Games
196413th International Stoke Mandeville Games.
later known as the 2nd Paralympic Games[8]
 Japan Tokyo
196514th International Stoke Mandeville Games
196615th International Stoke Mandeville Games
196716th International Stoke Mandeville Games
196817th International Stoke Mandeville Games.
later known as the 3rd Paralympic Games.[9]
 Israel Tel Aviv
196918th International Stoke Mandeville Games
197019th International Stoke Mandeville Games
197120th International Stoke Mandeville Games
197221st International Stoke Mandeville Games.
later known as the 4th Paralympic Games[9][10]
 Germany Heidelberg
197322nd International Stoke Mandeville Games
197423rd International Stoke Mandeville Games
197524th International Stoke Mandeville Games
19765th Summer Paralympics Canada Toronto
197725th International Stoke Mandeville Games
197826th International Stoke Mandeville Games
197927th International Stoke Mandeville Games
19806th Summer Paralympics Netherlands Arnhem
198128th International Stoke Mandeville Games
198229th International Stoke Mandeville Games
198330th International Stoke Mandeville Games
19847th Summer Paralympics United States
 United Kingdom Stoke Mandeville
198531st International Stoke Mandeville Games
198632nd International Stoke Mandeville Games
198733rd International Stoke Mandeville Games
19888th Summer Paralympics South Korea Seoul
198934th International Stoke Mandeville Games
199035th International Stoke Mandeville Games
199136th International Stoke Mandeville Games
19929th Summer Paralympics Spain Barcelona
199337th International Stoke Mandeville Games
199438th International Stoke Mandeville Games
199539th International Stoke Mandeville Games
199610th Summer Paralympics United States Atlanta

From 1997, the IWAS event was renamed World Wheelchair Games.

Year Name of the event Host annotation
1997World Wheelchair Games
1998World Wheelchair Games
1999World Wheelchair Games New Zealand Christchurch
200011th Summer Paralympics Australia Sydney
2001World Wheelchair Games[11]
2002World Wheelchair Games[11]
2003World Wheelchair Games[11] New Zealand Christchurch
200412th Summer Paralympics Greece Athens
2005World Wheelchair and Amputee Games[12] Brazil Rio de JaneiroOver 700 athletes from 44 nations. Five events: track and field, table tennis, archery, shooting, and billiards.[13]
2006World Wheelchair and Amputee Games India Bangalore
2007World Wheelchair and Amputee Games[14] Taiwan Taipei
200813th Summer Paralympics China Beijing
2009IWAS World Games[15][16][17][18] India Bangalore
2011IWAS World Games United Arab Emirates SharjahDecember 1–10, 2011[19]
201214th Summer Paralympics United Kingdom London
2013IWAS World Games Netherlands Stadskanaal
2015IWAS World Games Russia Sochi
201615th Summer Paralympics Brazil Rio de Janeiro
2017IWAS World Games Portugal Vila Real de Santo António
2019IWAS World Games United Arab Emirates Sharjah

IWAS World Games


Names :

  • 1-International Stoke Mandeville Games (1948 to 1995 consist of four paralympic games) - 39 Editions
  • 2-World Wheelchair Games (1997-2003) - 6 Editions
  • 3-World Wheelchair and Amputee Games (2005-2007) - 3 Editions
  • 4-IWAS World Games (2009 to 2017) - 5 Editions
No. Year Host City Events
1 2009 Bangalore, India
2 2011 Sharjah, UAE
3 2013 Stadskanaal, Netherlands
4 2015 Sochi, Russia
5 2017 Vila Real de Santo António, Portugal

IWAS Under 23 World Games (IWAS Junior World Games)


For some years now, the IWAS Federation has hosted junior competitions, which were named IWAS World Junior Games by 2015. Since 2016 they are called IWAS Under 23 World Games and will only be played in years with even numbers.[20]

No. Year Dates Host City Venue Events Results List
1 2005 6–7 July Stoke Mandeville, UK Result list
2 2006 14–16 July Dublin, Ireland Result list
3 2007 4–6 April Ekurhuleni, South Africa Germiston Sports Precinct Result list
4 2008 18–27 July Piscataway, United States Results
5 2009 16–19 July Nottwil, Switzerland SPZ Nottwil Result list
6 2010 19–26 August Olomouc, Czech Republic Results
7 2011 14–21 April Dubai, UAE Result List
8 2012 19–21 July Olomouc, Czech Republic Results
9 2013 14–21 August Mayaguez, Puerto Rico Central American Stadium Ergebnisliste
10 2014 3–7 August Stoke Mandeville, UK Results
11 2015 2–8 July Stadskanaal, Netherlands Sportpark Stadskanaal Ergebnisliste
12 2016 29 June–3 July Prague, Czech Republic Results

See also


References


  1. Randi Druzin (September 5, 2008). "Paralympics traces roots to Second World War". CBC Sports.
  2. BBC Wenlock and Mandeville
  3. Paralympics: Where Heroes Come Archived 2010-06-11 at the Wayback Machine, by Dr. Robert Steadward and Cynthia Peterson. Edmonton, Alberta: One Shot Holdings Ltd., 1997, melazerte.com, May 30, 2010
  4. Remembering Paralympics past, BBC, July 15, 2008
  5. The Paralympics: It all started with Veterans Archived 2016-08-15 at the Wayback Machine. Veteran Affairs Canada
  6. Chronology of Events in the Development of Wheelchair Basketball Archived 2011-04-30 at the Wayback Machine, International Wheelchair Basketball Federation (IWBF)
  7. Rome 1960, International Paralympic Committee (IPC)
  8. The Thirteenth International Stoke Mandeville Games for The Paralysed, dinf.ne.jp, March 17, 1999
  9. Summer Games Governance 1960 to 1992 Archived 2012-12-16 at archive.today, International Wheelchair and Amputee Sports Federation (IWAS)
  10. 21st Wheelchair Olympics, by Charles J. Bierbauer, The Pittsburgh Press, August 1, 1972, Google News Archive Search
  11. 2003 World Wheelchair Games / Jeux Mondiaux 2003 Archived 2010-02-17 at the Wayback Machine, Canadian Wheelchair Sports Association
  12. 2005 World Wheelchair and Amputee Games Archived 2010-12-12 at the Wayback Machine, cwsa.ca
  13. 21. Sports – Accomplishments Abroad – The First IWAS World Wheelchair and Amputee Games Archived 2011-06-18 at the Wayback Machine, gio.gov.tw
  14. Singapore wins 14 medals at 2007 World Wheelchair and Amputee Games, sglead.wordpress.com, September 18, 2007
  15. Official website of the 2009 IWAS World Games Archived 2010-05-07 at the Wayback Machine
  16. 2009 IWAS World Wheelchair & Amputee Games, International Wheelchair and Amputee Sports Federation (IWAS) Archived 2012-09-08 at archive.today
  17. The Official Website of 2009 IWAS World Games Archived 2010-05-07 at the Wayback Machine
  18. 2009 IWAS World Games, International Wheelchair and Amputee Sports Federation (IWAS), November 24, 2009
  19. IWAS announced today that the bid to host the IWAS World Games, International Wheelchair and Amputee Sports Federation (IWAS), February 8, 2011
  20. IWAS announces a new look for their IWAS Games programme, auf: iwasf.com, abgerufen 9. September 2016