Stomach

The stomach is a muscular, hollow organ in the gastrointestinal tract of humans and many other animals, including several invertebrates. The stomach has a dilated structure and functions as a vital organ in the digestive system. The stomach is involved in the gastric phase of digestion, following chewing. It performs a chemical breakdown by means of enzymes and hydrochloric acid.

Stomach
Scheme of digestive tract, with stomach in red.
Sections of the human stomach
Details
PrecursorForegut
SystemDigestive system
ArteryRight gastric artery, left gastric artery, right gastro-omental artery, left gastro-omental artery, short gastric arteries
VeinRight gastric vein, left gastric vein, right gastroepiploic vein, left gastroepiploic vein, short gastric veins
NerveCeliac ganglia, vagus nerve[1]
LymphCeliac lymph nodes[2]
Identifiers
LatinVentriculus
GreekGaster
MeSHD013270
TA98A05.5.01.001
TA22901
FMA7148
Anatomical terminology

In humans and many other animals, the stomach is located between the oesophagus and the small intestine. The stomach secretes digestive enzymes and gastric acid to aid in food digestion. The pyloric sphincter controls the passage of partially digested food (chyme) from the stomach into the duodenum, where peristalsis takes over to move this through the rest of intestines.


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This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Stomach, and is written by contributors. Text is available under a CC BY-SA 4.0 International License; additional terms may apply. Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.