Administrative divisions of Papua New Guinea


For administrative purposes, Papua New Guinea (PNG) is divided into administrative divisions called regions and provinces. Papua New Guinea is divided into four regions and 22 province-level divisions: 20 provinces plus the autonomous region (Bougainville) and the National Capital District.[1]

Each province is divided into one or more districts, which in turn are divided into one or more local level government areas (LLGs).

Regions


  Highlands Region
  Islands Region
  Momase Region
  Southern Region

PNG is divided into four regions. While not official administrative divisions for most purposes, regions are quite significant in daily life. People generally identify strongly with their region, and inter-region rivalries can be intense.

There are four regions, each of which comprises a number of provinces:

Momase is a recently devised portmanteau word which combines the first two letters of Morobe, Madang, and Sepik.

Provinces


PNG is also divided into 22 province-level divisions: 20 provinces plus the autonomous region (Bougainville) and the National Capital District.[1]

Provinces are the primary administrative divisions of PNG. Provincial governments are branches of the national government - PNG is not a federation of provinces. Each province forms a provincial electorate for the national parliament. The provinces are as follows:

  1. Central
  2. Chimbu (Simbu)
  3. Eastern Highlands
  4. East New Britain
  5. East Sepik
  6. Enga
  7. Gulf
  8. Madang
  9. Manus
  10. Milne Bay
  11. Morobe
  1. New Ireland
  2. Northern (Oro Province)
  3. Bougainville (North Solomons)
  4. Southern Highlands
  5. Western Province (Fly River)
  6. Western Highlands
  7. West New Britain
  8. West Sepik (Sandaun)
  9. National Capital District
  10. Hela
  11. Jiwaka
Provinces of Papua New Guinea

Districts


Each province is divided into one or more districts. As of 2011, there were 87 districts in PNG.[2]

Each district forms an open electorate for the national parliament, with the exception of the National Capital District, which is further divided into three open electorates.

Local-level governments


Each district is divided into one or more Local-Level Government areas, with the exception of the National Capital District.

There are 326 LLGs comprising 6,112 wards as of 2018.[3]

References