Sweden men's national handball team


The Sweden men's national handball team (Swedish: Sveriges herrlandslag i handboll) is controlled by the Swedish Handball Association. Its most successful periods were under coaches Curt Wadmark (1948–1967) and Bengt Johansson (1988–2004). The team under Bengt Johansson, nicknamed Bengan Boys in Sweden, is regarded as one of the finest national teams in the history of the sport with players like Tomas Svensson, Staffan Olsson, Magnus Wislander and Stefan Lövgren. From 1990 through 2002 the team reached the medal round in every championship (6 World Championships, 5 European Championships and 3 Olympic Games, earning 13 medals in total) and qualified for a record 8 championship finals in a row 1996–2002.

Sweden
Information
AssociationSwedish Handball Association
(Svenska Handbollförbundet)
CoachGlenn Solberg
Assistant coachMartin Boquist
Tomas Svensson
Most capsMagnus Wislander (386)
Most goalsMagnus Wislander (1191)
Colours
Home
Away
Results
Summer Olympics
Appearances8 (First in 1972)
Best result2nd (1992, 1996, 2000, 2012)
World Championship
Appearances25 (First in 1938)
Best result1st (1954, 1958, 1990, 1999)
European Championship
Appearances13 (First in 1994)
Best result1st (1994, 1998, 2000, 2002)
Last updated on Unknown.
Sweden men's national handball team
Medal record
Olympic Games
1992 BarcelonaTeam
1996 AtlantaTeam
2000 SydneyTeam
2012 LondonTeam
World Championship
1954 Sweden
1958 East Germany
1990 Czechoslovakia
1999 Egypt
1964 Czechoslovakia
1997 Japan
2001 France
2021 Egypt
1938 Germany
1961 West Germany
1993 Sweden
1995 Iceland
European Championship
1994 Portugal
1998 Italy
2000 Croatia
2002 Sweden
2018 Croatia
World Outdoor Championship
1948 France
1952 Switzerland
1959 Austria

Sweden is the most successful nation at the European Men's Handball Championship with 4 gold medals, and has won the most medals in the history of the World Men's Handball Championship with a total tally of 4 gold, 4 silver and 4 bronze medals. Conversely, Sweden has yet to win an Olympic title despite participating in a record 4 finals (Sweden participated in the 1952 Summer Olympics in a demonstration match, defeating Denmark 19–11). The team has also won the World Cup 3 times, the Supercup 2 times, and were Intercontinental Cup winners in 2000.

Honours


CompetitionTotal
Olympic Games 0404
World Championship 44412
European Championship 4105
Total89421

Competitive record


  Champions    Runners-up    Third place    Fourth place  

Olympic Games

Games Round Position Pld W D L GF GA GD
1936 Berlin Did not enter
Not held from 1948 to 1968
1972 Munich Match for 7th place 7th of 16 6 2 2 2 82 87 −5
1976 Montreal Did not qualify
1980 Moscow
1984 Los Angeles Match for 5th place 5th of 12 6 4 0 2 145 134 +11
1988 Seoul Match for 5th place 5th of 12 6 4 0 2 133 109 +24
1992 Barcelona Runners-up 2nd of 12 7 6 0 1 165 130 +35
1996 Atlanta Runners-up 2nd of 12 7 6 0 1 182 141 +41
2000 Sydney Runners-up 2nd of 12 8 7 0 1 240 197 +43
2004 Athens Did not qualify
2008 Beijing
2012 London Runners-up 2nd of 12 8 5 0 3 228 186 +42
2016 Rio de Janeiro Group stage 11th of 12 5 1 0 4 132 131 +1
2020 Tokyo Qualified
2024 Paris To be determined
2028 Los Angeles
Total 9/14 0 Titles 53 35 2 16 1307 1115 +192

World Championship

World Championship record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA GD
1938 Germany Third place 3rd of 4 3 1 0 2 8 13 −5
1954 Sweden Champions 1st of 6 3 3 0 0 56 36 +20
1958 East Germany Champions 1st of 16 6 6 0 0 138 74 +64
1961 West Germany Third place 3rd of 12 6 5 0 1 89 73 +16
1964 Czechoslovakia Runners-up 2nd of 16 6 3 0 3 104 90 +14
1967 Sweden Match for 5th place 5th of 16 6 4 0 2 118 112 +6
1970 France Match for 5th place 6th of 16 6 3 0 3 69 68 +1
1974 East Germany Preliminary round 10th of 16 6 3 0 3 111 113 −2
1978 Denmark Second round 8th of 16 6 2 0 4 121 125 −4
1982 West Germany Second round 11th of 16 7 2 1 4 159 157 +2
1986 Switzerland Fourth place 4th of 16 7 5 0 2 174 153 +21
1990 Czechoslovakia Champions 1st of 16 7 6 0 1 177 143 +34
1993 Sweden Third place 3rd of 16 7 6 0 1 166 136 +30
1995 Iceland Third place 3rd of 24 9 8 0 1 251 201 +50
1997 Japan Runners-up 2nd of 24 9 7 0 2 253 187 +66
1999 Egypt Champions 1st of 24 9 8 1 0 282 202 +80
2001 France Runners-up 2nd of 24 9 8 0 1 263 207 +56
2003 Portugal Second round 13th of 24 7 5 0 2 204 191 +13
2005 Tunisia Main round 11th of 24 9 4 1 4 275 234 +41
2007 GermanyDid not qualify
2009 Croatia Main round 7th of 24 9 6 0 3 277 232 +45
2011 Sweden Fourth place 4th of 24 10 6 0 4 272 241 +31
2013 SpainDid not qualify
2015 Qatar Round of 16 10th of 24 6 3 1 2 157 133 +24
2017 France Quarter-finals 6th of 24 7 5 0 2 233 166 +67
2019 Denmark/Germany Main round 5th of 24 9 7 0 2 273 222 +61
2021 Egypt Runners-up 2nd of 32 9 6 2 1 276 218 +58
2023 Poland/SwedenQualified as co-host
2025 Croatia/Denmark/NorwayTo be determined
2027 Germany
Total25/284 Titles17812265045063727+789

European Championship

European Championship record
Year Round Position Pld W D L GF GA GD
1994 Portugal Champions 1st of 12 7 7 0 0 172 133 +39
1996 Spain Fourth place 4th of 12 7 4 0 3 170 156 +14
1998 Italy Champions 1st of 12 7 6 0 1 182 158 +24
2000 Croatia Champions 1st of 12 7 7 0 0 198 167 +31
2002 Sweden Champions 1st of 16 8 7 0 1 235 191 +44
2004 Slovenia Main round 7th of 16 7 4 0 3 211 203 +8
2006 SwitzerlandDid not qualify
2008 Norway Match for 5th place 5th of 16 7 4 1 2 208 190 +18
2010 Austria Preliminary round 15th of 16 3 0 0 3 78 84 −6
2012 Serbia Main round 12th of 16 6 1 2 3 157 168 −11
2014 Denmark Main round 7th of 16 6 4 0 2 166 158  +8
2016 Poland Match for 7th place 8th of 16 7 2 2 3 173 168 +5
2018 Croatia Runners-up 2nd of 16 8 4 0 4 218 216 +2
2020 Austria/Norway/Sweden Main round 7th of 24 7 4 0 3 182 169 +13
2022 Hungary/SlovakiaQualified
2024 GermanyTo be determined
Total14/164 titles875452823392161+178
*Denotes draws include knockout matches decided on penalty throws.
**Gold background color indicates that the tournament was won. Red border color indicates tournament was held on home soil.

Team


Current squad

Squad for the 2021 World Men's Handball Championship.[1][2]

Head coach: Glenn Solberg

No. Pos. Name Date of birth (age) Height App. Goals Club
1 GK Peter Johannesson (1992-05-12) 12 May 1992 (age 28) 1.91 m 14 0 TBV Lemgo
2 LB Jonathan Carlsbogård (1995-04-19) 19 April 1995 (age 26) 1.95 m 1 1 TBV Lemgo
5 P Max Darj (1991-09-27) 27 September 1991 (age 29) 1.92 m 65 37 Bergischer HC
7 RB Jack Thurin (1999-06-09) 9 June 1999 (age 21) 1.99 m 10 17 IFK Skövde
8 LB Alfred Jönsson (1998-02-21) 21 February 1998 (age 23) 1.93 m 2 1 TSV Hannover-Burgdorf
11 RW Daniel Pettersson (1992-05-06) 6 May 1992 (age 29) 1.79 m 28 86 SC Magdeburg
12 GK Andreas Palicka (1986-07-10) 10 July 1986 (age 34) 1.89 m 105 6 Rhein-Neckar Löwen
15 LW Hampus Wanne (1993-12-10) 10 December 1993 (age 27) 1.85 m 33 79 SG Flensburg-Handewitt
16 GK Mikael Aggefors (1985-01-20) 20 January 1985 (age 36) 1.91 m 19 0 Aalborg Håndbold
18 P Fredric Pettersson (1989-02-11) 11 February 1989 (age 32) 2.01 m 56 77 Montpellier Handball
19 CB Felix Claar (1997-01-05) 5 January 1997 (age 24) 1.92 m 9 11 Aalborg Håndbold
22 LW Lucas Pellas (1995-08-28) 28 August 1995 (age 25) 1.83 m 15 41 Montpellier Handball
23 RB Albin Lagergren (1992-09-11) 11 September 1992 (age 28) 1.86 m 52 149 Rhein-Neckar Löwen
24 CB Jim Gottfridsson (1992-09-02) 2 September 1992 (age 28) 1.91 m 90 309 SG Flensburg-Handewitt
26 RB Linus Persson (1993-04-16) 16 April 1993 (age 28) 1.91 m 18 27 US Ivry Handball
27 LB Oskar Sunnefeldt (1998-04-21) 21 April 1998 (age 23) 1.98 m 2 8 THW Kiel
28 CB Jonathan Edvardsson (1997-04-07) 7 April 1997 (age 24) 1.90 m 1 0 IK Sävehof
32 CB Oscar Bergendahl (1995-03-08) 8 March 1995 (age 26) 1.92 m 9 18 GOG Håndbold
33 RB Lukas Sandell (1997-02-03) 3 February 1997 (age 24) 1.93 m 0 0 Aalborg Håndbold
62 RW Valter Chrintz (2000-04-26) 26 April 2000 (age 21) 1.84 m 15 19 Füchse Berlin
66 P Anton Lindskog (1993-12-07) 7 December 1993 (age 27) 1.98 m 14 12 HSG Wetzlar

Notable players

Coaches

# Coaches Period
1 Herbert Johansson1938–1948
2 Curt Wadmark1948–1967
3 Roland Mattsson1967–1974
4 Bertil Andersén1974–1979
5 Ingemar Eriksson1979–1980
6 Caj-Åke Andersson1980–1982
7 Roger "Ragge" Carlsson1982–1988
8 Bengt "Bengan" Johansson1988–2004
9 Ingemar Linnéll2004–2008
10 Ola Lindgren & Staffan Olsson2008–2016
11 Kristján Andrésson2016–2020
12 Glenn Solberg2020–

World & European Records


World Records

  • Longest undefeated streak in international championships (25 matches, Euro 1998 - 2000 Olympic Games).
  • Longest medal round streak in major championships (14 tournaments, 1990-2002).
  • Longest medal round streak in the World Championships (7 tournaments, 1986-2001).
  • 8 consecutive finals in international championships (1996-2002).
  • Most World Championship finals (8)
  • 3 consecutive World Championship finals (1997, 1999, 2001).
  • 3 consecutive Olympic finals (1992, 1996, 2000) (shared with France).

European Records

  • Most finals reached in international championships (17)
  • Most medals in international competition (21).
  • Most medal rounds in international competition (24) (shared with France).
  • 3 consecutive European Championship finals (1998, 2000, 2002) (shared with Spain).
  • 3 consecutive gold medals at the European championship (1998, 2000, 2002).
  • Only European nation to defend a championship title two times consecutively (Euro 2000, Euro 2002).

Other merits


  • 3 x winners of the World Cup (1992, 1996, 2004)
  • 2 x winners of the Supercup (1993, 2005)
  • 1 x winners of the Intercontinental Cup (2000)
  • The first IHF World Champion (1954 - indoor handball) (Germany's 1938 victory was under the IAHF).
  • The first EHF European Champion (1994).
  • Defeated Denmark 18-12 in Copenhagen in the first ever international indoor handball game (8 March 1935).

Kit supplier


From 2004 to 2015 Sweden's kits were supplied by Adidas, and 2016-2019 by Kempa. The current supplier is Craft.

See also


References


  1. "Oskar Sunnefeldt tar plats i VM-truppen". Handbollskanalen (in Swedish). 23 December 2020. Retrieved 15 January 2021.
  2. "Team Roster Sweden" (PDF). ihf.info. 15 January 2021. Retrieved 19 January 2021.