TED spread

The TED spread is the difference between the interest rates on interbank loans and on short-term U.S. government debt ("T-bills"). TED is an acronym formed from T-Bill and ED, the ticker symbol for the Eurodollar futures contract.

TED spread (in red) and components during the Financial crisis of 2007–08
TED spread (in green), 1986 to 2015.

Initially, the TED spread was the difference between the interest rates for three-month U.S. Treasuries contracts and the three-month Eurodollars contract as represented by the London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR). However, since the Chicago Mercantile Exchange dropped T-bill futures after the 1987 crash,[1] the TED spread is now calculated as the difference between the three-month LIBOR and the three-month T-bill interest rate.