Tamu Massif

Tamu Massif is a seamount in the northwest Pacific Ocean,[3] sitting atop a triple junction of mid-ocean ridges.[1] Tamu Massif is located in the Shatsky Rise about 1,600 km (990 mi) east of Japan. The massif covers an area of about 553,000 square kilometres (214,000 sq mi). Its summit is about 1,980 m (6,500 ft) below the surface of the ocean, and its base extends to about 6.4 km (4.0 mi) deep.[1] It is about 4,460 metres (14,620 ft) tall.

* Tamu
  Massif
Shatsky Rise
Emperor Seamounts Chain
Hawaiian Ridge
Japan
Kamchatka
Alaska
* Tamu
  Massif
Shatsky Rise
Emperor Seamounts Chain
Hawaiian Ridge
Japan
Kamchatka
Alaska
Location of Tamu Massif[4][5]
Tamu Massif
A bathymetric map of the volcano
Summit depth1,980 metres (6,500 ft)[1]
Height4,460 metres (14,620 ft)[1]
Location
LocationNorthwest Pacific Ocean
RangeShatsky Rise
Coordinates33°N 158°E
Geology
TypeSeamount (underwater volcano), shield volcano
Age of rock144.6 ± 0.8 Ma[2]

William Sager, a marine geophysicist from the Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Houston, began studying Tamu Massif in about 1993 at the Texas A&M College of Geosciences. In September 2013, Sager and his team concluded that Tamu Massif is "the biggest single shield volcano ever discovered on Earth". Other igneous features on the planet are larger, such as the Ontong Java Plateau, but it has not yet been determined if they are indeed just one volcano or rather complexes of several volcanoes.[6]


Share this article:

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Tamu Massif, and is written by contributors. Text is available under a CC BY-SA 4.0 International License; additional terms may apply. Images, videos and audio are available under their respective licenses.