Teen pop

Teen pop is a subgenre of pop music that is created, marketed and oriented towards preteens and teenagers.[1][7] Teen pop incorporates different subgenres of pop music,[7] as well as elements of R&B, dance, electronic, hip hop and rock,[1][2] while the music of girl groups, boy bands, and acts like Britney Spears, is sometimes referred to as pure pop.[8][9] Typical characteristics of teen pop music include Auto-Tuned vocals, choreographed dances, emphasis on visual appeal (photogenic faces, unique body physiques, immaculate hair styles and fashion clothes),[4] lyrics focused on love, relationships,[4] dancing, partying, friendship, puppy love (also known as a "crush")[10] and repeated chorus lines.[10] Its lyrics also incorporate sexual innuendo.[10] Teen pop singers often cultivate an image of a girl next door/boy next door.[4]

According to AllMusic, teen pop "is essentially dance-pop, pop, and urban ballads" that are marketed to teens, and was conceived in its contemporary form during the late 1980s and 1990s, pointing out the late 1990s as "arguably the style's golden era."[1] About.com's Bill Lamb described teen pop sound as "a simple, straightforward, ultra-catchy melody line [...] The songs may incorporate elements of other pop music genres, but usually they will never be mistaken for anything but mainstream pop. The music is designed for maximum focus on the performer and a direct appeal to listeners."[7]

In Crazy About You: Reflections on the Meanings of Contemporary Teen Pop Music (2002), Phillip Vannini and Scott M. Myers write that teen pop songs "are targeted to youths presumably unaware and unconcerned with the problems of everyday society. Youths are symbolized as mainly in growing up while having a good time."[10] Some authors deemed teen pop music as "more disposable, less intellectually challenging, more feminine, simpler and more commercially focused than other musical forms."[4] In Music Scenes: Local, Translocal and Virtual, author Melanie Lowe wrote that teen pop "is marked by a clash of presumed innocence and overt sexuality, a conflict that mirrors the physical and emotional turmoil of its primary target audience and vital fan base: early-adolescent middle-and upper middle-class suburban girls."[11]


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