Tel Megiddo

Tel Megiddo (Hebrew: תל מגידו; Arabic: مجیدو, Tell el-Mutesellim, lit. "Mound of the Governor"; Greek: Μεγιδδώ, Megiddo) is the site of the ancient city of Megiddo, the remains of which form a tell (archaeological mound), situated in northern Israel near Kibbutz Megiddo, about 30 km south-east of Haifa. Megiddo is known for its historical, geographical, and theological importance, especially under its Greek name Armageddon. During the Bronze Age, Megiddo was an important Canaanite city-state and during the Iron Age, a royal city in the Kingdom of Israel.

Tel Megiddo
מגידו
Aerial view of Tel Megiddo
Shown within Jezreel Valley region of Israel
Tel Megiddo (Israel)
Alternative nameTell el-Mutesellim
LocationNear Kibbutz Megiddo, Israel
RegionLevant
Coordinates32°35′07″N 35°11′04″E
TypeSettlement
Part ofKingdom of Israel, Canaan
History
Abandoned350 BCE
Official nameBiblical Tells – Megiddo, Hazor, Beer Sheba
TypeCultural
Criteriaii, iii, iv, vi
Designated2005 (29th session)
Reference no.1108
State PartyIsrael
RegionAsia-Pacific

Megiddo drew much of its importance from its strategic location at the northern end of the Wadi Ara defile, which acts as a pass through the Carmel Ridge, and from its position overlooking the rich Jezreel Valley from the west.

Excavations have unearthed 20 strata of ruins since the Neolithic phase, indicating a long period of settlement.[1] The site is now protected as Megiddo National Park and is a World Heritage Site.[2]


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