Thalamus

The thalamus (from Greek θάλαμος, "chamber")[1] is a large mass of gray matter located in the dorsal part of the diencephalon (a division of the forebrain). Nerve fibers project out of the thalamus to the cerebral cortex in all directions, allowing hub-like exchanges of information. It has several functions, such as relaying of sensory signals, including motor signals to the cerebral cortex[2][3][page needed] and the regulation of consciousness, sleep, and alertness.[4]

Thalamus
Thalamus marked (MRI cross-section)
The thalamus in a 360° rotation
Details
Part ofDiencephalon
PartsSee List of thalamic nuclei
ArteryPosterior cerebral artery and branches
Identifiers
Latinthalamus dorsalis
MeSHD013788
NeuroNames300
NeuroLex IDbirnlex_954
TA98A14.1.08.101
A14.1.08.601
TA25678
TEE5.14.3.4.2.1.8
FMA62007
Anatomical terms of neuroanatomy

Anatomically, it is a paramedian symmetrical structure of two halves (left and right), within the vertebrate brain, situated between the cerebral cortex and the midbrain. It forms during embryonic development as the main product of the diencephalon, as first recognized by the Swiss embryologist and anatomist Wilhelm His Sr. in 1893.[5]