The Philadelphia Inquirer

The Philadelphia Inquirer is a public-benefit corporation that publishes a news website (Inquirer.com) and two daily newspapers (The Philadelphia Inquirer and Daily News) that serve the Philadelphia metropolitan area of the United States. The newspaper was founded by John R. Walker and John Norvell in June 1829 as The Pennsylvania Inquirer and is the third-oldest continually operating daily newspaper in the United States.[2] Owned by The Lenfest Institute, a subsidiary of The Philadelphia Foundation, The Inquirer is the largest newspaper in the United States organized under nonprofit ownership.[3] As of 2007, it is the 17th largest average weekday U.S. newspaper circulation,[4] and has won 20 Pulitzer Prizes as of 2021.[5] It is the newspaper of record in the Delaware Valley.[6]

The Philadelphia Inquirer
The paper's May 2, 2011, front page
TypeDaily newspaper
FormatBroadsheet
Owner(s)The Lenfest Institute
Founder(s)John R. Walker and John Norvell
PublisherElizabeth H. Hughes
EditorGabriel Escobar
Deputy editorStephen Glynn, Brian Leighton, James Neff
Managing editorPatrick Kerkstra, Sandra Shea
FoundedJune 1, 1829; 192 years ago (1829-06-01) (as The Pennsylvania Inquirer)
Headquarters801 Market Street
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
CountryUnited States
Circulation193,497 daily
265,181 Sunday
(as of September 2020)[1]
Sister newspapersPhiladelphia Daily News
ISSN0885-6613
Websiteinquirer.com

The Inquirer first became a major newspaper during the American Civil War when its war coverage was popular on both sides. The paper's circulation dropped after the war, then rose by the end of the 19th century. Originally supportive of the Democratic Party, The Inquirer's political affiliation eventually shifted toward the Whig Party and then the Republican Party before officially becoming politically independent in the middle of the 20th century. By the end of the 1960s, The Inquirer trailed its chief competitor, the Philadelphia Evening Bulletin, and lacked modern facilities and experienced staff. In the 1970s, new owners and editors turned the newspaper into one of the country's most prominent.

The publisher and CEO is Elizabeth H. Hughes, and the editor is Gabriel Escobar.[7]