Timeline of Pskov


The following is a timeline of the history of the city of Pskov, Russia.

Prior to 20th century


20th century


  • 1903 - Archaeological museum active.[2]
  • 1911 - Olginsky Bridge [ru] opens.
  • 1913 - Population: 38,300.[8]
  • 1917 - March: Tsar Nicholas II abdicates while in Pskov.[1]
  • 1920 - Pskov State Theatre [ru] active.[citation needed]
  • 1939 - Population: 59,898.[1]
  • 1941
    • 9 July: City occupation by German forces begins
    • City renamed "Pleskau."[1]
    • Pskov Orthodox Mission [ru] begins.[9]
  • 1944
    • 23 July: City occupation by German forces ends.[1]
    • Pskovskaya Pravda newspaper in publication.
  • 1958 - Pskov Electric Machine-Building Plant active.[10]
  • 1959 - Population: 80,448.
  • 1960 - Pskov State Polytechnic Institute established.
  • 1965 - Population: 108,000.[11]
  • 1967 - Bridge of the 50th Anniversary of October [ru] opens.
  • 1985 - Population: 194,000.[12]
  • 1989 - Population: 203,789.
  • 1990 - Alexander Nevsky Bridge, Pskov [ru] opens.
  • 1996 - Yevgeny Mikhailov [ru] elected governor of the Pskov Oblast.[13]
  • 2000

21st century


  • 2009 - Ivan Tsetsersky [ru] becomes mayor.
  • 2010 - Population: 203,279.

See also


References


  1. Leon E. Seltzer, ed. (1952), "Pskov", Columbia Lippincott Gazetteer of the World, New York: Columbia University Press, p. 1525, OL 6112221M
  2. Britannica 1910.
  3. Langer 1984.
  4. Henry of Latvia, Heinrici Cronicon Lyvoniae, p. 131
  5. Lawrence N. Langer (2002). "Chronology". Historical Dictionary of Medieval Russia. Scarecrow Press. ISBN 978-0-8108-6618-8.
  6. "New Russian Cathedral Stymied by Interfaith Rift", New York Times, 10 September 2002
  7. Baedeker 1914.
  8. "Russia: Principal Towns: European Russia". Statesman's Year-Book. London: Macmillan and Co. 1921.
  9. Daniela Kalkandjieva (2015). The Russian Orthodox Church, 1917-1948: From Decline to Resurrection. Routledge. ISBN 978-1-317-65776-7.
  10. Eastern Europe, Russia and Central Asia 2003. Europa Publications. 2002. ISBN 978-1-85743-137-7.
  11. "Population of capital cities and cities of 100,000 and more inhabitants". Demographic Yearbook 1965. New York: Statistical Office of the United Nations. 1966.
  12. United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Statistical Office (1987). "Population of capital cities and cities of 100,000 and more inhabitants". 1985 Demographic Yearbook. New York. pp. 247–289.
  13. Robert A. Saunders; Vlad Strukov (2010). Historical Dictionary of the Russian Federation. Scarecrow Press. ISBN 978-0-8108-7460-2.
  14. Robert W. Orttung, ed. (2000). Republics and Regions of the Russian Federation: A Guide to Politics, Policies, and Leaders. M.E. Sharpe. ISBN 978-0-7656-0559-7.

This article incorporates information from the Russian Wikipedia.

Bibliography