Timeline of women in mathematics in the United States


There is a long history of women in mathematics in the United States. All women mentioned here are American unless otherwise noted.

Timeline


19th Century

  • 1829: The first public examination of an American girl in geometry was held.[1]
  • 1886: Winifred Edgerton Merrill became the first American woman to earn a PhD in mathematics, which she earned from Columbia University.[2]

20th Century

1970s
  • 1970: Mina Rees became the first female president of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.[10]
  • 1971:
    • Mary Ellen Rudin constructed the first Dowker space.[11]
    • The Association for Women in Mathematics (AWM) was founded. It is a professional society whose mission is to encourage women and girls to study and to have active careers in the mathematical sciences, and to promote equal opportunity for and the equal treatment of women and girls in the mathematical sciences. It is incorporated in the state of Massachusetts.[12]
    • The American Mathematical Society established its Joint Committee on Women in the Mathematical Sciences (JCW), which later became a joint committee of multiple scholarly societies.[13]
  • 1973: Jean Taylor published her dissertation on "Regularity of the Singular Set of Two-Dimensional Area-Minimizing Flat Chains Modulo 3 in R3" which solved a long-standing problem about length and smoothness of soap-film triple function curves.[14]
  • 1974: Joan Birman published the book Braids, Links, and Mapping Class Groups. It has become a standard introduction, with many of today's researchers having learned the subject through it.[15]
  • 1975–1977: Marjorie Rice, who had no formal training in mathematics beyond high school, discovered three new types of tessellating pentagons and more than sixty distinct tessellations by pentagons.[16]
  • 1975: Julia Robinson became the first female mathematician elected to the National Academy of Sciences.[17]
  • 1979:
1980s
1990s

21st Century

See also


Timeline of women in mathematics

References


  1. Elizabeth Cady Stanton; Susan B. Anthony; Matilda Joslyn Gage; Ida Husted Harper, eds. (1889). History of Woman Suffrage: 1848–1861, Volume 1. Susan B. Anthony. p. 36. Retrieved 2011-04-18. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. Susan E. Kelly & Sarah A. Rozner (28 February 2012). "Winifred Edgerton Merrill:"She Opened the Door"" (PDF). Notices of the AMS. 59 (4). Retrieved 25 January 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. "Mildred Leonora Sanderson". agnesscott.edu. Retrieved 2014-01-25. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. "Prizes, Awards, and Honors for Women Mathematicians". agnesscott.edu. Retrieved 2014-01-25. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. "Euphemia Lofton Haynes, first African American woman mathematician". math.buffalo.edu. Retrieved 2014-01-25. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. "Gertrude Mary Cox". agnesscott.edu. Retrieved 2014-01-25. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. "How Gladys West uncovered the 'Hidden Figures' of GPS". GPS World. 2018-03-19. Retrieved 2018-09-22.
  8. Mary L. Boas (1966). Mathematical methods in the physical sciences. Wiley.
  9. Spector, Donald (1999). "Book Reviews". American Journal of Physics. 67 (2): 165–169. doi:10.1119/1.19216.
  10. "Mina Rees". agnesscott.edu. Retrieved 2014-01-25. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  11. "New Zealand Mathematical Societu Newsletter Number 84, April 2002". Massey.ac.nz. Retrieved 2017-06-20. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  12. "About AWM - AWM Association for Women in Mathematics". Retrieved 2014-01-25. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  13. "JCW-Math | Joint Committee on Women in the Mathematical Sciences". jcwmath.wordpress.com. Retrieved 2014-01-25. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  14. "Jean Taylor". agnesscott.edu. Retrieved 2014-01-25. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  15. "Interview with Joan Birman" (PDF). Notices of the AMS. 54 (1). 4 December 2006. Retrieved 25 January 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  16. Doris Schattschneider. "Perplexing Pentagons". britton.disted.camosun.bc.ca. Archived from the original on 2016-08-13. Retrieved 2014-01-25. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  17. "Profiles of Women in Mathematics: Julia Robinson". awm-math.org. Retrieved 2014-01-25. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  18. Oakes, E.H. (2007). Encyclopedia of World Scientists. Facts On File, Incorporated. ISBN 9781438118826.
  19. "2005 Parson Lecturer - Dr. Doris Schattschneider". University of North Carolina at Asheville, Department of Mathematics. Archived from the original on 2014-01-11. Retrieved 2013-07-13. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link).
  20. Riddle, Larry (April 5, 2013). "Biographies of Women Mathematicians | Doris Schattschneider". Agnes Scott College. Retrieved 2013-07-13. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  21. "Gloria Ford Gilmer". math.buffalo.edu. Retrieved 2014-01-25. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  22. Rimer, Sara (10 October 2008). "Math Skills Suffer in U.S., Study Finds". The New York Times. Retrieved 2019-11-20.
  23. "Duke Magazine-Where Are They Now?-January/February 2010". dukemagazine.duke.edu. Retrieved 2014-01-25. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  24. "Melanie Wood: The Making of a Mathematician - Cogito". cogito.cty.jhu.edu. Retrieved 2014-01-25. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  25. "2003 Morgan Prize" (PDF). Notices of the AMS. 51 (4). 26 February 2004. Retrieved 25 January 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  26. "Math Forum @ Drexel: Congratulations, Alison!". mathforum.org. Retrieved 2014-01-25. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  27. Short vita, retrieved 2016-07-04.
  28. "UZH - Fields Medal Winner Artur Avila Appointed Full Professor at the University of Zurich". Media.uzh.ch. 2018-07-24. Retrieved 2018-10-09. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  29. Joshipura, Kaumudi Jinraj (February 2017). "CV" (PDF). Harvard School of Public Health.
  30. "Kaumudi Joshipura". Harvard School of Public Health. Retrieved 2019-07-29.
  31. Change, Kenneth (March 19, 2019). "Karen Uhlenbeck Is First Woman to Receive Abel Prize in Mathematics". New York Times. Retrieved 19 March 2019. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)

Further reading