Tinea versicolor

Tinea versicolor (also pityriasis versicolor) is a condition characterized by a skin eruption on the trunk and proximal extremities.[1] The majority of tinea versicolor is caused by the fungus Malassezia globosa, although Malassezia furfur is responsible for a small number of cases.[2][3] These yeasts are normally found on the human skin and become troublesome only under certain circumstances, such as a warm and humid environment, although the exact conditions that cause initiation of the disease process are poorly understood.[2][4]

Tinea versicolor
Other namesDermatomycosis furfuracea,[1] pityriasis versicolor,[1] tinea flava,[1] lota
SpecialtyDermatology

The condition pityriasis versicolor was first identified in 1846.[5] Versicolor comes from the Latin versāre 'to turn' + color.[6] It is also commonly referred to as Peter Elam's disease in many parts of South Asia.[7]


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