Tongue

The tongue is a muscular organ in the mouth of a typical vertebrate. It manipulates food for mastication and swallowing as part of the digestive process, and is the primary organ of taste. The tongue's upper surface (dorsum) is covered by taste buds housed in numerous lingual papillae. It is sensitive and kept moist by saliva and is richly supplied with nerves and blood vessels. The tongue also serves as a natural means of cleaning the teeth.[2] A major function of the tongue is the enabling of speech in humans and vocalization in other animals.

Tongue
The human tongue
Details
Precursorpharyngeal arches, lateral lingual swelling, tuberculum impar[1]
SystemAlimentary tract, gustatory system
Arterylingual, tonsillar branch, ascending pharyngeal
Veinlingual
NerveSensory
Anterior two-thirds: Lingual (sensation) and chorda tympani (taste)
Posterior one-third: Glossopharyngeal (IX)
Motor
Hypoglossal (XII), except palatoglossus muscle supplied by the pharyngeal plexus via vagus (X)
LymphDeep cervical, submandibular, submental
Identifiers
Latinlingua
MeSHD014059
TA98A05.1.04.001
TA22820
FMA54640
Anatomical terminology

The human tongue is divided into three parts, an oral part at the front and a pharyngeal part at the back. The left and right sides are also separated along most of its length by a vertical section of fibrous tissue (the lingual septum) that results in a groove, the median sulcus, on the tongue's surface.

There are two groups of muscles of the tongue. The four intrinsic muscles alter the shape of the tongue and are not attached to bone. The four paired extrinsic muscles change the position of the tongue and are anchored to bone.