Troy weight

Troy weight is a system of units of mass that originated in 15th-century England,[1] and is primarily used in the precious metals industry. The troy weight units are the grain, the pennyweight (24 grains), the troy ounce (20 pennyweights), and the troy pound (12 troy ounces). The troy grain is equal to the grain unit of the avoirdupois system, but the troy ounce is heavier than the avoirdupois ounce, and the troy pound is lighter than the avoirdupois pound. One troy ounce (oz t) equals exactly 31.1034768 grams.

Troy ounce is a traditional unit of gold weight.
One-troy-ounce (480 gr; 31 g) samples of germanium, iron, aluminium, rhenium and osmium
A Good Delivery silver bar weighing 1,000 troy ounces (83 troy pounds; 31 kg)

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