Tungsten carbide

Tungsten carbide
Names
IUPAC name
Tungsten carbide
Other names
Tungsten(IV) carbide
Tungsten tetracarbide
Identifiers
  • 12070-12-1 Y
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.031.918
EC Number
  • 235-123-0
RTECS number
  • YO7250000
UN number 3178
  • InChI=1S/C.W/q-1;+1 N
    Key: UONOETXJSWQNOL-UHFFFAOYSA-N N
  • (W+≡C): [C-]#[W+]
Properties
WC
Molar mass 195.85 g·mol−1
Appearance Grey-black lustrous solid
Density 15.63 g/cm3[1]
Melting point 2,785–2,830 °C (5,045–5,126 °F; 3,058–3,103 K)[2][3]
Boiling point 6,000 °C (10,830 °F; 6,270 K)
at 760 mmHg[3]
Insoluble
Solubility Soluble in HNO
3
, HF[2]
1·10−5 cm3/mol[2]
Thermal conductivity 110 W/(m·K)[4]
Structure
Hexagonal, hP2[5]
P6m2, No. 187[5]
6m2[5]
a = 2.906 Å, c = 2.837 Å[5]
α = 90°, β = 90°, γ = 120°
Trigonal prismatic (center at C)[6]
Thermochemistry
39.8 J/(mol·K)[4]
32.1 J/mol·K
Related compounds
Other anions
Tungsten boride
Tungsten nitride
Other cations
Molybdenum carbide
Titanium carbide
Silicon carbide
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
N verify (what is YN ?)
Infobox references

Tungsten carbide (chemical formula: WC) is a chemical compound (specifically, a carbide) containing equal parts of tungsten and carbon atoms. In its most basic form, tungsten carbide is a fine gray powder, but it can be pressed and formed into shapes through a process called sintering for use in industrial machinery, cutting tools, abrasives, armor-piercing shells and jewellery.

Tungsten carbide is approximately twice as stiff as steel, with a Young's modulus of approximately 530–700 GPa (77,000 to 102,000 ksi),[4][7][8][9] and is double the density of steel—nearly midway between that of lead and gold. It is comparable with corundum (α-Al
2
O
3
) in hardness and can be polished and finished only with abrasives of superior hardness such as cubic boron nitride and diamond powder, wheels and compounds.