All-American Bowl (high school football)


The All-American Bowl is a high school football all-star game, held annually at the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas. Typically played in January, the All-American Bowl is played between all-star teams representing the eastern and western United States.

All-American Bowl
All-American Bowl presented by American Family Insurance
StadiumAlamodome
LocationSan Antonio, Texas
Operated2000–present
Sponsors
U.S. Army (2000–2018)
American Family Insurance (2019–present)

Seventeen All-Americans have been Heisman Trophy finalists, with over 450 later playing in the National Football League. Notable alumni include: Andrew Luck, Adrian Peterson, Odell Beckham Jr., Eric Berry, Tim Tebow, Joe Thomas, Tyron Smith, Robert Quinn, C. J. Mosley, DeMarco Murray, and Chase Young.[1]

The All-American Bowl was previously organized by All-American Games; in 2019, the game's broadcaster NBC Sports announced that it had acquired the game and its assets.

History


It was first played on December 30, 2000 at Highlander Stadium in Dallas.[2] In 2002, the game was moved to San Antonio.[1]

NBC started broadcasting the All-American Bowl in 2004.[1] As a result, the game became a platform for participating college prospects to announce a verbal commitment to their future university.[3]

Since the game's inception, attendance has risen from 6,300 for the inaugural game in 2000[2] to a record 40,568 in 2017. The United States Army served as title sponsor of the game until 2017, when it announced that it would not renew its sponsorship past the 2018 edition. As of 2019, the game is currently played as the All-American Bowl presented by American Family Insurance.[4][5]

On February 25, 2019, it was announced that All-American Games had sold the game to NBC Sports Group for an undisclosed "seven-figure" amount. There were plans to leverage NBC's other platforms, including NBCSN, and SportsEngine (a provider of digital media services oriented towards youth and amateur sports) as part of promotion and coverage of the game.[1][6] This purchase did not include other events owned by All-American Games, such as the FBU National Championships (a youth football event) and the FBU Freshman All-American Bowl — both held annually in Naples, Florida, which were sold separately to All-American Games vice-president Steve Quinn and partner Erik Richards.[7]

The 2021 game (originally scheduled for January 9, 2021) was canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic. In place of the game, NBC scheduled an All-American Bowl: Declaration Day special on January 2, 2021, to honor top players of the 2020 season and air commitment announcements.[8][9]

Awards


During the week of the game, a number of national awards are given out at a formal awards dinner, which include:

Following the conclusion of the game on Saturday afternoon, the following awards are given out:

Selection process


All-American Bowl players are chosen through a national "selection tour" and associated combine.

Game records


Record category Record holder Year Record
Highest Attendance2017201740,568
Longest Touchdown PassTravis Waller to Derrius Guice201592 yards
Most Passing YardsSpencer Rattler2019234 yards
Most Passing TouchdownsGraham Mertz20195 TDs
Most Rushing YardsDemetrius Hart2011100 yards (8 carries)
Most Rushing TouchdownsMost Recently: Royce Freeman (tied with 3 others)20143 TDs
Most Receiving YardsDerrius Guice2015153 yards (2 receptions)
Most Points, Single PlayerMost Recently: Royce Freeman (tied with 3 others)201418 points
Most TacklesDe'Anthony Thomas20118 tackles
Longest Kickoff Return TDTed Ginn, Jr.200498 yards
Largest Margin of VictoryEast over West 47-3200344 points

Game results


East victories are shaded ██ red. West victories shaded ██ gold.

Date Site Result Series
December 30, 2000Highlander Stadium • Dallas, Texas West 18–15 West 1–0
January 5, 2002Alamo StadiumSan Antonio, Texas West 26–6 West 2–0
January 5, 2003Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas East 47–3 West 2–1
January 3, 2004Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas East 45–28 Tied 2–2
January 15, 2005Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas West 35–3 West 3–2
January 7, 2006Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas East 27–16 Tied 3–3
January 6, 2007Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas West 24–7 West 4–3
January 5, 2008Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas East 33–23 Tied 4–4
January 3, 2009Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas East 30–17 East 5–4
January 9, 2010Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas West 30–14 Tied 5–5
January 8, 2011Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas East 13–10 East 6–5
January 7, 2012Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas West 24–12 Tied 6–6
January 5, 2013Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas East 15–8 East 7–6
January 4, 2014Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas West 26–8 Tied 7–7
January 3, 2015Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas West 39–36 West 8–7
January 9, 2016Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas West 37–9 West 9–7
January 7, 2017 Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas East 27–17 West 9–8
January 6, 2018 Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas West 17–16 West 10–8
January 5, 2019 Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas East 48–14 West 10–9
January 4, 2020 Alamodome • San Antonio, Texas West 33–20 West 11–9

Game MVPs


A game MVP is announced following each year's All-American Bowl. In the past, the winner of the MVP award was given the Pete Dawkins Trophy, named for 1958 Heisman Trophy winner Pete Dawkins, but as of 2019 this award name is no longer active.

DeSean Jackson receives the Pete Dawkins Trophy from General Richard A. Cody at the 2005 All-American Bowl.
SeasonPlayerPositionHigh schoolCollegeRef.
2001Dominic RobinsonWRDiamond Bar High SchoolFlorida State
2002Vince YoungQBMadison High SchoolTexas
2003Chris LeakQBIndependence High SchoolFlorida
2004Ted Ginn, Jr.WRGlenville High SchoolOhio State
2005DeSean JacksonWRLong Beach Polytechnic High SchoolCalifornia[10]
2006Chris WellsRBGarfield High SchoolOhio State[11]
2007Chris GalippoLBServite High SchoolUSC[12]
2008Terrelle PryorQBJeannette High SchoolOhio State[13]
2009Tajh Boyd
Bryce Brown
QB
RB
Phoebus High School
Wichita High School East
Clemson
Tennessee
[14]
2010Ronald PowellDERancho Verde High SchoolFlorida[15]
2011Demetrius HartRBDr. Phillips High SchoolAlabama
Colorado State
[16]
2012Dorial Green-Beckham
Cyler Miles
WR
QB
Hillcrest High School
J.K. Mullen High School
Missouri
Washington
[17]
2013James QuickWRTrinity High SchoolLouisville[18]
2014Joe MixonRBFreedom High SchoolOklahoma[19]
2015Derrius GuiceRBCatholic High SchoolLSU[20]
2016Shea PattersonQBIMG AcademyOle Miss
Michigan
[21]
2017Hunter JohnsonQBBrownsburg High SchoolClemson
Northwestern
[22]
2018Caden SternsDBSteele High SchoolTexas[23]
2019Graham MertzQBBlue Valley North High SchoolWisconsin[24]
2020Bryce YoungQBMater Dei High SchoolAlabama[25]

Notable participants


2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

Source:[26]

2008

Source:[27]

2009

Sources:[28][29]

2010

Sources:[30][31]

2011

Source:[32]

2012

Sources:[33][34]

2013

Source:[35]

2014

Source:[36]

2015

Source:[37]

2016

Source:[38]

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

Notes


  1. Hayes, Dade (February 25, 2019). "NBC Sports Acquires The All-American Bowl, A High School Football Showcase". Deadline. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  2. "U.S. Army All-American Past Games". Scout.com. Archived from the original on July 20, 2007. Retrieved October 24, 2007.
  3. "San Antonio's All-American Bowl losing its major sponsor". Bizjournals.com. Retrieved January 5, 2019.
  4. Zuvanich, Adam (January 20, 2017). "Army ending sponsorship of All-American Bowl". San Antonio Express-News. Retrieved January 5, 2019.
  5. Fields, Scott. "Three area players named finalists for ASWA awards". Opelika-Auburn News. Retrieved January 5, 2019.
  6. "NBC Sports Group Acquires High School Football Showcase". Sports Business Journal. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  7. Fisher, Adam (February 25, 2019). "Youth football: FBU is now head quartered in Naples Florida". Naples Daily News. Gannett Company. Retrieved February 26, 2019.
  8. Shapiro, Michael. "2021 All-American Bowl Canceled, Will Return in 2022". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved January 2, 2021.
  9. "Which top unsigned 2021 recruits are committing on All-American Bowl Declaration Day?". USA TODAY High School Sports. December 30, 2020. Retrieved January 2, 2021.
  10. "WR DeSean Jackson famously picked Cal over USC on our set in 2005". Fox Sports. January 30, 2017.
  11. Nelson, Glenn (January 7, 2006). "All's Wells for East". 247Sports.com.
  12. "2007 All-American Bowl". Sports Illustrated. January 8, 2007.
  13. "Pryor has 155 all-purpose yards, wins All-American Bowl MVP". Plainview Daily Herald. Plainview, TX. January 4, 2008.
  14. "Boyd shines in all-star game". Daily Press. January 3, 2009.
  15. Goldbach, Brad (June 7, 2010). "Florida Gator Ronald Powell Could Revolutionize College Football". Bleacher Report.
  16. Chan, Lorne (January 8, 2011). "East defense dominates All-American Bowl". San Antonio Express-News.
  17. Hurtik, Blake (January 7, 2012). "U.S. Army All American Bowl: Top high school stars put on a show". Houston Chronicle.
  18. Gall, Braden (January 7, 2013). "2013 U.S. Army All-American Bowl Winners and Losers". Athlon Sports.
  19. Roth, Nick (January 7, 2014). "East County Around the Horn: Joe Mixon is MVP of Army All-American Bowl". The Mercury News.
  20. Lopez, Andrew (January 3, 2015). "LSU commitment Derrius Guice named MVP of the 2015 U.S. Army All-American Bowl". NOLA.com.
  21. Gray, Jeff (January 9, 2016). "Shea Patterson named MVP of the 2016 US Army All-American Bowl". Red Cup Rebellion. Vox Media.
  22. Glenesk, Matthew (January 7, 2017). "Mr. Football Hunter Johnson wins Army All-American Game MVP". Indy Star.
  23. Miller, Kerry (January 6, 2018). "Winners, Losers and Grades from the 2018 Army All-American Game". Bleacher Report.
  24. Kocorowski, Jack (January 6, 2019). "Graham Mertz breaks a record, wins MVP honors at 2019 All-American Bowl". Bucky's 5th Quarter. Vox Media.
  25. Barnett, Zach (January 4, 2020). "All the commitments from the Army All-American Bowl". NBC Sports. NBC Sports.
  26. "2007 U.S. ARMY ALL AMERICAN BOWL ROSTERS". usarmyallamericanbowl.com. Archived from the original on January 15, 2007. Retrieved September 1, 2017.CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  27. "U.S. Army All-American Bowl Rosters". cstv.com. December 14, 2007. Archived from the original on September 2, 2017. Retrieved September 1, 2017.CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  28. "2009 East Roster". usarmyallamericanbowl.com. Archived from the original on February 17, 2009. Retrieved September 1, 2017.CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  29. "2009 West Roster". usarmyallamericanbowl.com. Archived from the original on February 17, 2009. Retrieved September 1, 2017.CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  30. "U.S. Army All-American Bowl Game roster: East". maxpreps.com. December 17, 2009. Archived from the original on September 2, 2017. Retrieved September 1, 2017.CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  31. "U.S. Army All-American Bowl Game roster: West". maxpreps.com. December 17, 2009. Archived from the original on September 2, 2017. Retrieved September 1, 2017.CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  32. Bois, Jon (January 8, 2011). "U.S. Army All-American Bowl: Game History And Rosters For Saturday's East And West Teams". sbnation.com. Archived from the original on September 2, 2017. Retrieved September 1, 2017.CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  33. "2012 U.S. Army All-American Bowl game roster: East". maxpreps.com. December 30, 2011. Archived from the original on September 2, 2017. Retrieved September 1, 2017.CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  34. "2012 U.S. Army All-American game roster: West". maxpreps.com. December 30, 2011. Archived from the original on September 2, 2017. Retrieved September 1, 2017.CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  35. Eberts, Wescott (December 30, 2012). "2013 US Army All-American game roster". sbnation.com. Archived from the original on September 2, 2017. Retrieved September 1, 2017.CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  36. "U.S. Army All-American Bowl rosters". 247sports.com. December 27, 2013. Archived from the original on September 2, 2017. Retrieved September 1, 2017.CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  37. "2015 U.S. Army All-American Bowl Roster: By Team". n.rivals.com. December 17, 2014. Retrieved September 1, 2017.
  38. Judin, Robert (January 4, 2016). "2016 U.S. Army All-American Bowl: Rosters, Coaching Staffs". watchstadium.com. Archived from the original on September 2, 2017. Retrieved September 1, 2017.CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  39. Polacek, Scott. "Army All-American Bowl Roster 2017: Breaking Down Top Recruits in Marquee Game". Bleacher Report. Retrieved April 2, 2020.
  40. "DeMatha defensive end Chase Young solidifies standing with Army All-American selection". usatodayhss.com. USA Today. Retrieved April 5, 2020.