U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is a large independent agency of the United States federal government, created in the aftermath of the Wall Street Crash of 1929.[2][3][4] The primary purpose of the SEC is to enforce the law against market manipulation.[5][6]:2

U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
Seal of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission headquarters in Washington, D.C.
Agency overview
FormedJune 6, 1934; 87 years ago (1934-06-06)
JurisdictionUnited States federal government
HeadquartersWashington, D.C., U.S.
Employees4,301 (2015)[1]
Agency executive
Websitewww.sec.gov

In addition to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, which created it, the SEC enforces the Securities Act of 1933, the Trust Indenture Act of 1939, the Investment Company Act of 1940, the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, the Sarbanes–Oxley Act of 2002, and other statutes. The SEC was created by Section 4 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (now codified as 15 U.S.C. § 78d and commonly referred to as the Exchange Act or the 1934 Act).[7]