United States Conference of Catholic Bishops

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB) is the episcopal conference of the Catholic Church in the United States. Founded in 1966 as the joint National Conference of Catholic Bishops (NCCB) and United States Catholic Conference (USCC), it is composed of all active and retired members of the Catholic hierarchy (i.e., diocesan, coadjutor, and auxiliary bishops and the ordinary of the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of Saint Peter) in the United States and the territory of the U.S. Virgin Islands. In the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the bishops in the six dioceses form their own episcopal conference, the Puerto Rican Episcopal Conference. The bishops in U.S. insular areas in the Pacific Ocean  the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, the territory of American Samoa, and the territory of Guam  are members of the Episcopal Conference of the Pacific.

United States Conference of Catholic Bishops
AbbreviationUSCCB
Formation1966
TypeNon-governmental organization
Legal statusCivil nonprofit
Purpose
  • To act collaboratively and consistently on vital issues confronting the Church and society.
  • To foster communion with the Church in other nations, within the Church universal, under the leadership of its supreme pastor, the Roman Pontiff.
  • To offer appropriate assistance to each bishop in fulfilling his particular ministry in the local Church.
[1]
HeadquartersWashington, D.C.
Region served
United States
Membership
Active and retired Catholic bishops of the United States
President
José Horacio Gómez
Main organ
Conference
Affiliations
Budget
US$180 million
Staff
300
Websiteusccb.org

The USCCB adopted its current name in July 2001. The organization is a registered corporation based in Washington, D.C. As with all bishops' conferences, certain[which?] decisions and acts of the USCCB must receive the recognitio, or approval, of the Roman dicasteries, which are subject to the immediate and absolute authority of the Pope.

As of November 2019, the president is José Horacio Gómez, the archbishop of Los Angeles. The vice president is Allen Henry Vigneron, archbishop of Detroit.[2]