United States Olympic & Paralympic Committee

The United States Olympic & Paralympic Committee (USOPC) is the National Olympic Committee and the National Paralympic Committee for the United States. It was founded in 1895 as the United States Olympic Committee, and is headquartered in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The USOPC is one of only four NOCs in the world that also serve as the National Paralympic Committee for their country. The USOPC is responsible for supporting, entering and overseeing U.S. teams for the Olympic Games, Paralympic Games, Youth Olympic Games, Pan American Games, and Parapan American Games and serves as the steward of the Olympic and Paralympic Movements in the United States.

United States Olympic & Paralympic Committee
Country/Region United States
CodeUSA
Created1894
Recognized1894
Continental
Association
PASO
HeadquartersColorado Springs, Colorado
PresidentSusanne Lyons
Secretary GeneralSarah Hirschland[1]
Websitewww.teamusa.org
U.S. Paralympics
a division of the U.S. Olympic & Paralympic Committee
Logo
National Paralympic Committee
Country United States
CodeUSA
Recognized2001
Continental
Association
APC
HeadquartersColorado Springs, Colorado
PresidentCheri Blauwet
Websitewww.teamusa.org/US-Paralympic

The Olympic Movement is overseen by the International Olympic Committee. The IOC is supported by 35 international federations that govern each sport on a global level, National Olympic Committees that oversee Olympic sport as a whole in their respective nations, and national federations that administer each sport at the national level (called National Governing Bodies, or NGBs, in the United States). The National Paralympic Committee is the sole governing body responsible for the selection and training of all athletes participating in the Paralympic Games.

The USOPC is one of 204 NOCs and 174 NPCs within the international Olympic and Paralympic movements. Forty-seven NGBs are members of the USOPC. Fifteen of the NGBs also manage sports on the Paralympic program (there are fewer Paralympic sports in the world). While the USOPC governs four Paralympic sports (cycling, skiing, swimming and track & field), five other Paralympic sports are governed by U.S. members of International Paralympic Federations (wheelchair basketball, boccia, goalball, powerlifting and wheelchair rugby).

Unlike most other nations, the United States government does not have a Ministry of Sports and does not fund its Olympic Committee. This is in part due to the taboo of mixing sports and politics in the US. The USOPC was reorganized by the Ted Stevens Olympic and Amateur Sports Act, originally enacted in 1978. It is a federally chartered nonprofit corporation and does not receive federal financial support (other than for select Paralympic military programs). Pursuant to the Act, the USOPC has the exclusive right to use and authorize the use of Olympic-related marks, images and terminology in the United States. The USOPC licenses that right to sponsors as a means of generating revenue in support of its mission.[2][3]

The USOPC was previously called the United States Olympic Committee, or USOC, but changed its name on June 20, 2019, the first Olympic Committee in the world to include the word “Paralympic” in its name.[4]