United States Postal Service Office of Inspector General

The United States Postal Service Office of Inspector General (OIG) was created by Public Law 104–208,[1] passed by Congress in 1996. The inspector general of the United States Postal Service (USPS) is appointed by the presidentially appointed governors on the Board of Governors of the United States Postal Service and reports to them. The term of the inspector general is a maximum of seven years. To ensure accountability, the inspector general keeps Congress, the governors, and Postal Service management informed of the office's work and alerted to potential areas where the Postal Service could be more economical and efficient.

United States
Postal Service Office of Inspector General
Agency overview
Formed1996
JurisdictionUnited States
Agency executive
  • Tammy Whitcomb, United States Postal Service Office of Inspector General
Parent agencyUnited States Postal Service
Websitehttps://www.uspsoig.gov/about-us/about-oig

The OIG achieves its mission of helping maintain confidence in the postal system and improving the Postal Service's bottom line through independent audits and investigations. Audits of postal programs and operations help to determine whether the programs and operations are efficient and cost-effective. Investigations help prevent and detect fraud, waste, and misconduct and have a deterrent effect on postal crimes.[2]

The United States Postal Inspection Service is a separate agency.[3]