Voltaire

François-Marie Arouet (French: [fʁɑ̃swa maʁi aʁwɛ]; 21 November 1694  30 May 1778), known by his nom de plume Voltaire (/vɒlˈtɛər, vl-/;[5][6][7] also US: /vɔːl-/;[8][9] French: [vɔltɛːʁ]), was a French Enlightenment writer, historian, and philosopher famous for his wit, his criticism of Christianity—especially the Roman Catholic Church—as well as his advocacy of freedom of speech, freedom of religion, and separation of church and state.

Voltaire
Portrait by Nicolas de Largillière, c. 1724
BornFrançois-Marie Arouet
(1694-11-21)21 November 1694
Paris, Kingdom of France
Died30 May 1778(1778-05-30) (aged 83)
Paris, Kingdom of France
Resting placePanthéon, Paris, France
OccupationWriter, philosopher
LanguageFrench
NationalityFrench
Alma materCollège Louis-le-Grand
PartnerÉmilie du Châtelet (1733–1749)

Philosophy career
EraAge of Enlightenment
RegionWestern philosophy
French philosophy
SchoolLumières
Philosophes
Deism
Classical liberalism
Main interests
Political philosophy, literature, historiography, biblical criticism
Notable ideas
Philosophy of history,[1] freedom of religion, freedom of speech, separation of church and state
Signature

Voltaire was a versatile and prolific writer, producing works in almost every literary form, including plays, poems, novels, essays, histories, and scientific expositions. He wrote more than 20,000 letters and 2,000 books and pamphlets.[10] He was one of the first authors to become renowned and commercially successful internationally. He was an outspoken advocate of civil liberties and was at constant risk from the strict censorship laws of the Catholic French monarchy. His polemics witheringly satirized intolerance, religious dogma, and the French institutions of his day.