William of Ockham

William of Ockham (/ˈɒkəm/; also Occam, from Latin: Gulielmus Occamus;[9][10] c. 1287 – 10 April 1347) was an English Franciscan friar, scholastic philosopher, and theologian, who is believed to have been born in Ockham, a small village in Surrey.[11] He is considered to be one of the major figures of medieval thought and was at the centre of the major intellectual and political controversies of the 14th century. He is commonly known for Occam's razor, the methodological principle that bears his name, and also produced significant works on logic, physics, and theology. William is remembered in the Church of England with a commemoration on 10 April.[12]

William of Ockham

William of Ockham depicted on a stained glass window at a church
Born1285
Died1347 (aged 6162)
EducationGreyfriars, London[1]
Alma materUniversity of Oxford[2][3]
Notable work
Summa Logicae
Era14th-century philosophy
Medieval philosophy
RegionWestern philosophy
SchoolScholasticism
Occamism
Nominalism[lower-alpha 1]
Theological voluntarism[4]
Main interests
Notable ideas
Occam's razor
Nominalism
Empiricism[5]
Sketch labelled "frater Occham iste", from a manuscript of Ockham's Summa Logicae, 1341