Vilnius

Vilnius (/ˈvɪlniəs/ VIL-nee-əs, Lithuanian: [ˈvʲɪlʲnʲʊs] (listen); see also other names) is the capital and largest city of Lithuania, with a population of 588,412 as of 2021.[6] The population of Vilnius's functional urban area, which stretches beyond the city limits, is estimated at 706,832 (as of 2019),[7] while according to the Vilnius territorial health insurance fund, there were 732,421 permanent inhabitants as of October 2020 in Vilnius city and Vilnius district municipalities combined.[12] Vilnius is in southeastern Lithuania and is the second-largest city in the Baltic states. It is the seat of Lithuania's national government and the Vilnius District Municipality.

Vilnius
Nickname(s): 
Jerusalem of Lithuania,[1] Rome of the North,[2] Athens of the North,[3] New Babylon,[4] The city/capital of Palemon[5]
Motto(s): 
Unitas, Justitia, Spes
(Latin: Unity, Justice, Hope)
Interactive map of Vilnius
Vilnius
Location within Lithuania
Vilnius
Location within the Baltics
Vilnius
Location within Europe
Coordinates: 54°41′N 25°17′E
CountryLithuania
CountyVilnius County
MunicipalityVilnius City Municipality
Capital ofLithuania
First mentioned1323
Granted city rights1387
Elderships
Government
  TypeCity council
  MayorRemigijus Šimašius
Area
  Capital city401 km2 (155 sq mi)
  Metro
9,731 km2 (3,757 sq mi)
Elevation
112 m (367 ft)
Population
 (2021)[6]
  Capital city588,412
  Rank(31st in EU)
  Density1,392/km2 (3,610/sq mi)
  Urban
706,832[7]
  Metro
829,759[8]
  Metro density83/km2 (210/sq mi)
Demonym(s)Vilnian
Time zoneUTC+2 (EET)
  Summer (DST)UTC+3 (EEST)
Postal code
01001–14191
Area code(s)(+370) 5
GMP (nominal)[9]2019
 – Total€20.7 billion
($24B)
 – Per capita€25,400
($29012)
City budget€740 million[10]
HDI (2019)0.920[11]very high
Websitevilnius.lt
Official nameHistoric Centre of Vilnius
TypeCultural
Criteriaii, iv
Designated1994 (18th session)
Reference no.
UNESCO regionEurope

Vilnius is classified as a Gamma global city according to GaWC studies,[13] and is known for the architecture in its Old Town, declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1994.[14] Before World War II, Vilnius was one of the largest Jewish centres in Europe. Its Jewish influence has led to its nickname "the Jerusalem of Lithuania". Napoleon called it "the Jerusalem of the North"[15] as he was passing through in 1812. In 2009, Vilnius was the European Capital of Culture, together with Linz, Austria.[16] In 2021, Vilnius was named among top-25 fDi's Global Cities of the Future – one of the most forward-thinking cities with the greatest potential in the World.[17]