Zygote

A zygote (from Ancient Greek ζυγωτός (zygōtós) 'joined, yoked', from ζυγοῦν (zygoun) 'to join, to yoke')[1] is a eukaryotic cell formed by a fertilization event between two gametes. The zygote's genome is a combination of the DNA in each gamete, and contains all of the genetic information of a new individual organism.

Zygote formation: egg cell after fertilization with a sperm. The male and female pronuclei are converging, but the genetic material is not yet united.
Zygote (cell)
Details
Days0
PrecursorGametes
Gives rise toBlastomeres
Identifiers
MeSHD015053
TEE2.0.1.2.0.0.9
FMA72395
Anatomical terminology

In multicellular organisms, the zygote is the earliest developmental stage. In humans and most other anisogamous organisms, a zygote is formed when an egg cell and sperm cell come together to create a new unique organism. In single-celled organisms, the zygote can divide asexually by mitosis to produce identical offspring.

German zoologists Oscar and Richard Hertwig made some of the first discoveries on animal zygote formation in the late 19th century.


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