How anti-vax memes replicate through satire and irony

Memes that promote harmful conspiracies and memes that mock them are sometimes hard to distinguish.

Jan Buts, Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Translation Studies, Trinity College Dublin • conversation
today ~8 min

covid-19 coronavirus anti-vaccination anti-vaxxers memes viral-content 4chan irony

What’s not being said about why African Americans need to take the COVID-19 vaccine

Black people are skeptical about the new vaccines for many reasons. If public health leaders told the full story, maybe there'd be a higher chance that Black people would want to take the vaccine.

Debra Furr-Holden, Associate Dean for Public Health Integration, Michigan State University • conversation
Dec. 23, 2020 ~9 min

 covid-19  coronavirus  herd-immunity  african-americans  anti-vaxxers  blacks

Latinos are especially reluctant to get flu shots – how a small clinic in Indiana found ways to overcome that

Millions of Latinos may not get the influenza shot this year, which could be an indicator of whether they will get a COVID-19 shot. A rural clinic shows how building trust can help overcome reluctance.

Jennifer Coddington, Clinical Professor of Nursing, Purdue University • conversation
Dec. 9, 2020 ~7 min

covid-19 latinx flu vaccination healthcare anti-vaxxers covid-19-vaccine flu-shot flu-vaccine

COVID-19: four ways to respond to vaccine sceptics – and maybe even convince them

Think beyond facts to make your argument.

Mark Lorch, Professor of Science Communication and Chemistry, University of Hull • conversation
Nov. 25, 2020 ~7 min

covid-19 vaccination misinformation coronavirus-2020 science-communication anti-vaxxers

An AI tool can distinguish between a conspiracy theory and a true conspiracy – it comes down to how easily the story falls apart

Computational methods could help identify conspiracy theories as they emerge.

Timothy R. Tangherlini, Professor of Danish Literature and Culture, University of California, Berkeley • conversation
Nov. 13, 2020 ~10 min

machine-learning artificial-intelligence covid-19 anti-vaccination conspiracy-theories anti-vaxxers narrative pizzagate qanon narrative-research conspiracy-thinking

Ingredients in flu vaccine won't hurt you – two pharmacists explain why

Many people object to the added ingredients in vaccines. But pharmacists explain why those fears are unwarranted.

Anne P. Kim, Clinical assistant professor, Washington State University • conversation
Nov. 13, 2020 ~9 min

influenza autism fda flu anti-vaccination viruses immune-response anti-vaxxers flu-vaccine

Why scientists and public health officials need to address vaccine mistrust instead of dismissing it

People who oppose vaccines often are dismissed as ignorant or naive. Failing to hear their concerns and address them may only be fueling vaccine resistance, however.

Porismita Borah, Associate Professor, health communication, Washington State University • conversation
Oct. 30, 2020 ~10 min

covid-19 vaccination coronavirus-2020 coronavirus-vaccine anti-vaxxers covid-19-vaccine vaccine-hesitancy polio-vaccine

How to build trust in a COVID vaccine

A public campaign to build trust may be needed if a successful vaccine candidate is to be taken by enough Americans to interrupt the COVID pandemic, a Harvard public health expert said.

Alvin Powell • harvard
Sept. 16, 2020 ~6 min

covid-19 coronavirus pandemic health-medicine alvin-powell the-forum-at-harvard-th-chan-school-of-public-health vaccine barry-bloom anti-vaxxers new-england-journal-of-medicine glen-nowak vaccine-skepticism walter-orenstein

How to talk to vaccine skeptics so they might actually hear you

Those opposing vaccinations often mistrust government, science and the news media. There may be better ways to persuade them than by offering facts only.

Porismita Borah, Associate Professor, Washington State University • conversation
Aug. 20, 2020 ~9 min

 covid-19  coronavirus  fake-news  pandemic  vaccines  flu  vaccination  anti-vaxxers  news-media  covid-19-vaccine  flu-vaccine

Here's how to talk to vaccine skeptics so they might actually hear you

Those opposing vaccinations often mistrust government, science and the news media. There may be better ways to persuade them than by offering facts only.

Porismita Borah, Associate Professor, Washington State University • conversation
Aug. 20, 2020 ~9 min

 covid-19  coronavirus  fake-news  pandemic  vaccines  flu  vaccination  anti-vaxxers  news-media  covid-19-vaccine  flu-vaccine

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