Smog-eating graphene composite reduces atmospheric pollution

An international group of scientists, including from the University of Cambridge, have developed a graphene composite that can ‘eat’ common atmospheric pollutants, and could be used as a coating on pavements or buildings.

Cambridge University News | Dec. 5, 2019 | cambridge
~6 mins   

Tags: graphene pollution advanced-materials environment engineering

Women in STEM: Dr Jenny Zhang

Dr Jenny Zhang is a group leader and BBSRC David Phillips Fellow in the Department of Chemistry, where she is re-wiring photosynthesis to generate renewable fuels. Here, she tells us about why she switched from cancer research to sustainability, how her Fellowship programme is helping her develop leadership skills, and why eggs in her childhood home would regularly go missing.

Cambridge University News | Dec. 5, 2019 | cambridge
~6 mins   

Tags: energy fuel solar sustainability sustainable-earth women-in-stem

Green-sky thinking for propulsion and power

A rapid way of turning ideas into new technologies in the aviation and power industries has been developed at Cambridge’s Whittle Laboratory. Here, Professor Rob Miller, Director of the Whittle, describes how researchers plan to scale the process to cover around 80% of the UK’s future aerodynamic technology needs.

Cambridge University News | Dec. 4, 2019 | cambridge
~7 mins   

Tags: sustainable-earth environment aircraft energy innovation engineering climate-change carbon-emissions

Green-sky thinking for propulsion and power

A rapid way of turning ideas into new technologies in the aviation and power industries has been developed at Cambridge’s Whittle Laboratory. Here, Professor Rob Miller, Director of the Whittle, describes how researchers plan to scale the process to cover around 80% of the UK’s future aerodynamic technology needs.

Cambridge University News | Dec. 4, 2019 | cambridge
~7 mins   

Tags: sustainable-earth environment aircraft energy innovation engineering climate-change carbon-emissions

Study highlights potential for ‘liquid health check’ to predict disease risk

Proteins in our blood could in future help provide a comprehensive ‘liquid health check’, assessing our health and predicting the likelihood that we will we will develop a range of diseases, according to research published today in Nature Medicine.

Cambridge University News | Dec. 2, 2019 | cambridge
~7 mins   

Tags: spotlight-on-future-therapeutics future-therapeutics diagnostic protein proteomics

Placenta changes could mean male offspring of older mums more likely to develop heart problems in later life, rat study finds

Changes occur in the placenta in older pregnant mothers leading to a greater likelihood of poor health in their male offspring, a study in rats has shown. 

Cambridge University News | Nov. 28, 2019 | cambridge
~5 mins   

Tags: reproduction

Women in STEM: Fiona Llewellyn Beard

Fiona Llewellyn Beard is a PhD candidate in the Department of Earth Sciences, where she studies salt marshes and how they store huge amounts of carbon. Here, she tells us about how a childhood love of mud pies led to her current research, her love of the outdoors, and how everything in the environment is interconnected. 

Cambridge University News | Nov. 28, 2019 | cambridge
~4 mins   

Tags: women-in-stem environment sustainable-earth conservation

Opinion: Depression - men far more at risk than women in deprived areas

Deprivation affects men and women differently, writes Olivia Remes, PhD candidate at the Cambridge Institute of Public Health, with men more likely to experience depression.

Cambridge University News | Nov. 27, 2019 | cambridge
~5 mins   

Tags: spotlight-on-neuroscience mental-health depression socioeconomic-differences

‘Trickster god’ used fake news in Babylonian Noah story

An early example of fake news has been found in the 3000-year-old Babylonian story of Noah and the Ark, which is widely believed to have inspired the Biblical tale. Nine lines etched on ancient clay tablets that tell the Gilgamesh Flood story can now be understood in very different ways – according to a Cambridge academic.

Cambridge University News | Nov. 26, 2019 | cambridge
~4 mins   

Tags: fake-news

Women in STEM: Amy Rankine

Amy Rankine is a PhD candidate in the Institute of Astronomy and a member of Clare Hall. Here, she tells us about being the first in her family to go to university, why she decided to pursue an academic career, and how the brightest things in the universe affect the formation of galaxies. 

Cambridge University News | Nov. 21, 2019 | cambridge
~4 mins   

Tags: astronomy space black-hole women-in-stem

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