More health inequality: Black people are 3 times more likely to experience pulse oximeter errors

Low oxygen levels can be a sign that a patient is in danger. A device that measures oxygen levels has been shown to miss low oxygen levels in Black people much more often than in white people.

Susan Dorr Goold, Professor of Internal Medicine and Health Management and Policy, University of Michigan Medical School • conversation
yesterday ~9 min

health-disparities health-gaps

Does 'deplatforming' work to curb hate speech and calls for violence? 3 experts in online communications weigh in

Banning extremists from social media platforms can reduce hate speech, but the deplatforming process has to be handled with care – and it can have unintended consequences.

Ugochukwu Etudo, Assistant Professor of Operations and Information Management, University of Connecticut • conversation
yesterday ~10 min

social-media donald-trump twitter disinformation misinformation right-wing-extremism us-capitol-incursion parler

Vampire finches: how little birds in the Galápagos evolved to drink blood

Finches have evolved to feed off blood from red-footed and Nazca boobies – and we've seen it first-hand.

Jaime Chaves, Assistant Professor, Ecology and Evolution, San Francisco State University • conversation
yesterday ~7 min

evolution birds natural-selection mutualism darwins-finches parasitism galapagos

Digital hoarders: we've identified four types – which are you?

Physical hoarding has been studied for decades - but now, new forms of digital hoarding are emerging.

Nick Neave, Associate Professor in Psychology, and Director of the Hoarding Research Group, Northumbria University, Newcastle • conversation
yesterday ~7 min

obsessive-compulsive-disorder ocd hoarding hoarding-disorder

Francis Galton pioneered scientific advances in many fields – but also founded the racist pseudoscience of eugenics

Smart people can have really bad ideas – like selectively breeding human beings to improve the species. Put into practice, Galton's concept proved discriminatory, damaging, even deadly.

Richard Gunderman, Chancellor's Professor of Medicine, Liberal Arts, and Philanthropy, Indiana University • conversation
yesterday ~9 min

 statistics  charles-darwin  history-of-science  forensic-science  meteorology  prayer  fingerprints  eugenics  on-the-origin-of-species  francis-galton  forced-sterilization

What you need to know about the new COVID-19 variants

A biologist who studies the evolution of diseases explains what's different about the two new virus strains that have been found recently, and what that means for vaccine effectiveness.

David Kennedy, Assistant Professor of Biology, Penn State • conversation
yesterday ~7 min

evolution covid-19 coronavirus vaccines mutation

Cities can help migrating birds on their way by planting more trees and turning lights off at night

Cities are danger zones for migrating birds, but there are ways to help feathered visitors pass through more safely

Frank La Sorte, Research Associate, Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Cornell University • conversation
yesterday ~9 min

birds migration trees citizen-science parks migratory-birds sustainable-cities light-pollution pavement urban-trees ebird

Climate change: what would 4°C of global warming feel like?

Climate models are likely underestimating the true severity of future warming in urban areas.

Robert Wilby, Professor of Hydroclimatic Modelling, Loughborough University • conversation
yesterday ~8 min

climate-change global-warming temperature temperature-records extreme-heat 15-degrees global-temperature urban-heat

Vampire finches: how little birds in the Galápagos got a taste for big bird blood

Finches have evolved to feed off blood from red-footed and Nazca boobies – and we've seen it first-hand.

Jaime Chaves, Assistant Professor, Ecology and Evolution, San Francisco State University • conversation
yesterday ~7 min

evolution birds natural-selection mutualism darwins-finches parasitism galapagos

Synced brains: how to bond with your kids – according to neuroscience

The brain activity of a parent and child can become synchronised during play and problem solving.

Pascal Vrticka, Lecturer in Psychology, University of Essex • conversation
yesterday ~7 min

brain neuroscience parenting child-development

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