A probiotic therapy for patients with inflammatory bowel disease

A genetically programmed living hydrogel material that facilitates intestinal wound healing is being considered for development as a probiotic therapy for patients with inflammatory bowel disease.

Benjamin Boettner | Dec. 6, 2019 | harvard
~7 mins   

Tags: science-technology basic-research crohns-disease e-wyss-institute-for-biologically-inspired-engineering-at-harvard e-coli-nissle-strain ibd inflammatory-bowel-disease mucosal-healing probiotic probiotic-therapy ulcerative-colitis


Understanding the impact of deep-sea mining

Mining materials from the sea floor could help secure a low-carbon future, but researchers are racing to understand the environmental effects.

Mary Beth Gallagher | Department of Mechanical Engineering | Dec. 5, 2019 | mit
~11 mins   

Tags: mechanical-engineering school-of-engineering oceanography-and-ocean-engineering environment sustainability batteries renewable-energy research energy-storage

Smog-eating graphene composite reduces atmospheric pollution

An international group of scientists, including from the University of Cambridge, have developed a graphene composite that can ‘eat’ common atmospheric pollutants, and could be used as a coating on pavements or buildings.

Cambridge University News | Dec. 5, 2019 | cambridge
~6 mins   

Tags: graphene pollution advanced-materials environment engineering

Green-sky thinking for propulsion and power

A rapid way of turning ideas into new technologies in the aviation and power industries has been developed at Cambridge’s Whittle Laboratory. Here, Professor Rob Miller, Director of the Whittle, describes how researchers plan to scale the process to cover around 80% of the UK’s future aerodynamic technology needs.

Cambridge University News | Dec. 4, 2019 | cambridge
~7 mins   

Tags: sustainable-earth environment aircraft energy innovation engineering climate-change carbon-emissions

Monthly birth control pill could replace daily doses

Long-lasting capsule can remain in the stomach and release contraceptive drugs over several weeks.

Anne Trafton | MIT News Office | Dec. 4, 2019 | mit
~7 mins   

Tags: research drug-delivery chemical-engineering mechanical-engineering koch-institute institute-for-medical-engineering-and-science-imes school-of-engineering health medicine developing-countries women drug-development

Green-sky thinking for propulsion and power

A rapid way of turning ideas into new technologies in the aviation and power industries has been developed at Cambridge’s Whittle Laboratory. Here, Professor Rob Miller, Director of the Whittle, describes how researchers plan to scale the process to cover around 80% of the UK’s future aerodynamic technology needs.

Cambridge University News | Dec. 4, 2019 | cambridge
~7 mins   

Tags: sustainable-earth environment aircraft energy innovation engineering climate-change carbon-emissions

A new way to control microbial metabolism

Chemical engineers program bacteria to switch between different metabolic pathways, boosting their yield of desirable products.

Anne Trafton | MIT News Office | Dec. 2, 2019 | mit
~6 mins   

Tags: research chemical-engineering school-of-engineering national-science-foundation-nsf bacteria microbes biological-engineering synthetic-biology

New treatment could ease the passage of kidney stones

Muscle relaxants delivered to the ureter can reduce contractions that cause pain when passing a stone.

Anne Trafton | MIT News Office | Dec. 2, 2019 | mit
~7 mins   

Tags: research materials-science-and-engineering dmse koch-institute school-of-engineering national-institutes-of-health-nih health-science-and-technology medicine


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