Some kindergartners are more likely to be heavy users of online tech later, according to new research

Too much screen time doesn't leave enough time for other important parts of growing up. Predicting which little kids will likely grow into heavy tech users could help target educational campaigns.

Paul L. Morgan, Eberly Fellow, Professor Education and Demography, and Director of the Center for Educational Disparities Research, Penn State • conversation
Jan. 12, 2021 ~7 min

education children social-media reading parenting child-development quick-reads research-brief screen-time behavior gaming screentime new-research online-technologies

Some kindergartners are more likely later to be heavy users of online tech, according to new research

Too much screen time doesn't leave enough time for other important parts of growing up. Predicting which little kids will likely grow into heavy tech users could help target educational campaigns.

Paul L. Morgan, Eberly Fellow, Professor Education and Demography, and Director of the Center for Educational Disparities Research, Penn State • conversation
Jan. 12, 2021 ~7 min

education children social-media reading parenting child-development quick-reads research-brief screen-time behavior gaming screentime new-research

Seat belts and smoking rates show people eventually adopt healthy behaviors – but it can take time we don't have during a pandemic

Public health recommendations have always been a hard sell. Resistance to new behaviors – like the mask-wearing and social distancing advised during the COVID-19 pandemic – is part of human nature.

Randy P. Juhl, Dean Emeritus and Distinguished Service Professor Emeritus of Pharmacy, University of Pittsburgh • conversation
Dec. 29, 2020 ~7 min

 public-health  covid-19  coronavirus  smoking  pandemic  science  statins  life-expectancy  human-behavior  health-behaviors  ideology  immunization  medical-advice

How to outsmart your COVID-19 fears and boost your mood in 2021

One medication-free technique uses your emotions to release stress.

Laurel Mellin, Associate Professor Emeritus of Family & Community Medicine and Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco • conversation
Dec. 28, 2020 ~6 min

health mental-health covid-19 coronavirus depression anxiety stress fear training emotions fight-or-flight cognitive-behavioral-therapy self-help

We discovered a 115,000-year-old iguana nest fossil in the Bahamas

A trace fossil of an iguana burrow was discovered on San Salvador Island in the Bahamas. Estimated to be 115,000 years old, it is the first known fossil of its kind.

Melissa Hage, Assistant Professor of Environmental Science, Emory University • conversation
Dec. 9, 2020 ~7 min

nests fossils endangered-species animal-behavior the-bahamas limestone

Racial discrimination ages Black Americans faster, according to a 25-year-long study of families

A study of 800 Black American families shows early experiences of racism have long-term consequences for physical and mental health.

Sierra Carter, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Georgia State University • conversation
Nov. 17, 2020 ~5 min

 poverty  mental-health  blacklivesmatter  aging  stress  health-disparities  disease  biomarkers  healthcare  quick-reads  research-brief  racism  living-longer-2020  african-americans  age  adolescents  health-behaviors  human-body  resiliency  racial-discrimination  american-academy-of-pediatrics  black-americans  black-health-disparities

Scientists identify specific brain region and circuits controlling attention

Norepinephrine-producing neurons in the locus coeruleus produce attention focus, impulse control via two distinct connections to prefrontal cortex.

David Orenstein | Picower Institute for Learning and Memory • mit
Nov. 3, 2020 ~8 min

neuroscience anxiety biology optogenetics research behavior school-of-science brain-and-cognitive-sciences picower-institute

Study helps explain why motivation to learn declines with age

Research on mice suggests aging affects a brain circuit critical for learning to make some types of decisions.

Anne Trafton | MIT News Office • mit
Oct. 27, 2020 ~8 min

neuroscience aging research behavior school-of-science brain-and-cognitive-sciences mcgovern-institute

Sick of COVID-19? Here's why you might have pandemic fatigue

It's draining and depressing to stay on high alert month after month after month. Understanding pandemic fatigue better might help you strengthen your resolve.

Jay Maddock, Professor of Public Health, Texas A&M University • conversation
Oct. 23, 2020 ~8 min

public-health covid-19 coronavirus psychology handwashing social-distancing social-norms reopening loneliness social-isolation face-masks masks health-behaviors wearing-masks preventive-health effects-of-social-distancing loneliness-and-social-distancing reopening-after-social-distancing coronavirus-and-handwashing business-reopenings covid-19-prevention

The urge to punish is not only about revenge – unfairness can unleash it, too

Unfairness alone is upsetting enough to drive people to punish lucky recipients of unfair outcomes.

Paul Deutchman, PhD Candidate in Psychology, Boston College • conversation
Sept. 30, 2020 ~6 min

morality psychology inequality competition motivation behavioral-economics evolutionary-psychology psychology-research fairness morals punishment justice deterrence stealing moral-outrage theft inequity social-inequity

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