Q&A: Climate Grand Challenges finalists on accelerating reductions in global greenhouse gas emissions

Faculty leaders describe their efforts to develop potentially game-changing tools.

MIT News Office • mit
March 17, 2022 ~13 min

How we discovered that sea turtles in Seychelles have recovered from the brink

Sea turtles of Aldabra were almost hunted to extinction. But thanks to years of protection the much-loved animals are now thriving again - and so is the iconic giant tortoise.

Cheryl Sanchez, PhD Candidate, Biology, University of Pisa • conversation
March 17, 2022 ~7 min


Why do flocks of birds swoop and swirl together in the sky? A biologist explains the science of murmurations

These coordinated movements of a flock of starlings follow no plan or leader. Scientists used to think the animals must communicate via ESP to create these fast-moving blobs.

Tom Langen, Professor of Biology, Clarkson University • conversation
March 14, 2022 ~7 min

Russia's false claims about biological weapons in Ukraine demonstrate the dangers of disinformation and how hard it is to counter – 4 essential reads

The Russian government used disinformation to fabricate a justification for invading Ukraine. A new campaign focused on biowarfare claims threatens to escalate the conflict.

Eric Smalley, Science + Technology Editor • conversation
March 14, 2022 ~8 min

Microbes and minerals may have set off Earth’s oxygenation

Scientists propose a new mechanism by which oxygen may have first built up in the atmosphere

Jennifer Chu | MIT News Office • mit
March 14, 2022 ~6 min

An “oracle” for predicting the evolution of gene regulation

Researchers create a mathematical framework to examine the genome and detect signatures of natural selection, deciphering the evolutionary past and future of non-coding DNA.

Raleigh McElvery | Department of Biology • mit
March 11, 2022 ~9 min

Deer have antlers, walruses have tusks – here’s why so few birds have weapons of their own

Birds will shriek and dive at each other over food, territory or mates, but only a small number of species sport actual weapons. The reason: Flying matters more for their survival than fighting.

João C. T. Menezes, PhD Student in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, UMass Amherst • conversation
March 7, 2022 ~9 min

Deer have horns, walruses have tusks – here’s why so few birds have weapons of their own

Birds will shriek and dive at each other over food, territory or mates, but only a small number of species sport actual weapons. The reason: Flying matters more for their survival than fighting.

João C. T. Menezes, PhD Student in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, UMass Amherst • conversation
March 7, 2022 ~9 min


New MRI probe can reveal more of the brain’s inner workings

Tracing connections between neuron populations could help researchers map brain circuits that underlie behavior and perception.

Anne Trafton | MIT News Office • mit
March 3, 2022 ~7 min

Animals have evolved to avoid overexploiting their resources – can humans do the same?

New research sheds light on why predators don’t evolve to become so aggressive that they eat all their prey – and then go extinct themselves.

Axel G. Rossberg, Reader in Theoretical Ecology, Queen Mary University of London • conversation
March 3, 2022 ~7 min

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