Twitter posts show that people are profoundly sad – and are visiting parks to cheer up

Research that measures the public mood based on Twitter posts shows that it's currently at its lowest point in a decade. One exception: when people visit parks and green spaces.

Taylor Ricketts, Professor and Director, Gund Institute for Environment, University of Vermont • conversation
Aug. 6, 2020 ~8 min

social-media mental-health covid-19 twitter parks city-parks outdoors san-francisco cincinnati minneapolis george-floyd-protests

Parks matter more than ever during a time of sickness – something Frederick Law Olmsted understood in the 19th century

Frederick Law Olmsted, the designer of many great North American city parks, understood that ready access to nature made cities healthier places to live.

Richard leBrasseur, Assisant Professor of Landscape Architecture and Director, Green Infrastructure Performance Lab, Dalhousie University • conversation
May 18, 2020 ~8 min

public-health cities covid-19 social-distancing coronavirus-2020 urban-life parks city-parks landscape-architecture sustainable-cities

Is your city making you fat? How urban planning can address the obesity epidemic

Four out of 5 Americans live in cities, so urban planning can make a big difference in our lifestyles – especially if it promotes healthy diets and physical activity.

John Rennie Short, Professor, School of Public Policy, University of Maryland, Baltimore County • conversation
Feb. 20, 2020 ~8 min

 cities  obesity  exercise  walking  urban-planning  bicycling  urban-policy  parks  food-deserts  city-parks

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