World’s largest ever DNA sequencing of Viking skeletons reveals they weren’t all Scandinavian

Invaders, pirates, warriors – the history books taught us that Vikings were brutal predators who travelled by sea from Scandinavia to pillage and raid their

Cambridge University News • cambridge
Sept. 16, 2020 ~8 min

Tags: ancient-dna dna viking

Scientists discover new rules about “runaway” transcription

Findings related to bacterial gene expression overturn fundamental assumptions about basic biological pathways.

Raleigh McElvery | Department of Biology • mit
Sept. 2, 2020 ~7 min

Tags: dna physics genetics bacteria biology rna research school-of-science

The COVID-19 virus can spread through the air – here's what it'll take to detect the airborne particles

Miniaturized laboratory equipment is making it easier to identify airborne pathogens in the field, but there's still work ahead to be able to instantly determine if a room is safe or contaminated.

Shantanu Sur, Associate Professor of Biology, Clarkson University • conversation
Aug. 14, 2020 ~9 min

Tags: dna covid-19 coronavirus pandemic rna sars-cov-2 viruses pathogens star-trek airborne-virus metagenomics next-generation-sequencing pcr

Four-stranded DNA structures found to play role in breast cancer

Four stranded DNA structures – known as G-quadruplexes – have been shown to play a role in certain types of breast cancer for the first time, providing a

Cambridge University News • cambridge
Aug. 3, 2020 ~5 min

Tags: dna genetics cancer breast-cancer

Rosalind Franklin centenary: 'She would have been totally amazed'

The sister of Rosalind Franklin says she would be surprised to be a "feminist icon" 100 years on.

BBC Science News • bbcnews
July 25, 2020 ~2 min

Tags: dna chemistry cambridge viruses university-of-cambridge

Gene-controlling mechanisms play key role in cancer progression

Study finds “epigenomic” alterations evolve as lung tumors become more aggressive and metastasize.

Anne Trafton | MIT News Office • mit
July 23, 2020 ~7 min

Tags: dna cancer biology research school-of-science national-institutes-of-health-nih koch-institute

Do stone tools put humans in America 30K years ago?

Researchers say DNA from stone tools from in a Mexican cave suggests humans first arrived in America about 15,000 years earlier than previously thought.

Michael Skov Jensen-Copenhagen • futurity
July 23, 2020 ~5 min

Tags: dna archaeology migration science-and-technology early-humans caves stone-tools north-america

3 Questions: Ibrahim Cissé on using physics to decipher biology

A biophysicist employs super-resolution microscopy to peer inside living cells and witness never-before-seen phenomena.

Raleigh McElvery | Department of Biology • mit
July 22, 2020 ~7 min

Tags: dna physics biology research school-of-science faculty 3-questions

Sexism pushed Rosalind Franklin toward the scientific sidelines during her short life, but her work still shines on her 100th birthday

Franklin was born a century ago, and her X-ray crystallography work crucially contributed to determining the structure of DNA.

Richard Gunderman, Chancellor's Professor of Medicine, Liberal Arts, and Philanthropy, Indiana University • conversation
July 20, 2020 ~8 min

Tags:  dna  women-in-stem  nobel-prize  women-in-science  history-of-science  sexism  james-watson  x-ray-diffraction  dna-structure  rosalind-franklin  francis-crick  x-ray-crystallography

Gardenias show how plants became great chemists

Sequencing the gardenia genome shows how plants evolved to re-use tricks from their genetic toolbox to create new chemicals.

Charlotte Hsu-Buffalo • futurity
June 25, 2020 ~9 min

Tags: dna evolution plants genomes science-and-technology flowers

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