Big step toward identifying all cancer-causing genetic mutations

An international team of 1,300 scientists has generated the most complete cancer genome map to date, bringing researchers closer to identifying all major cancer-causing genetic mutations.

Stephanie McPherson • harvard
Feb. 5, 2020 ~12 min

Tags:  science-technology  engineering  bioengineering  basic-research  broad-institute-of-mit-and-harvard  cancer-genome-map  cancer-causing-genetic-mutations  icgctcga-pan-cancer-analysis-of-whole-genomes-project  pan-cancer-project  whole-cancer-genomes

Women in STEM: Shagita Gounden

Shagita Gounden is a systems engineer working on the world’s largest radio telescope, an Executive MBA candidate at Cambridge Judge Business School, and a member of St Edmund’s College. Here, she tells us about being part of a massive global science project, the benefits of working with an international team, and how it makes her hopeful as a South African.

Cambridge University News • cambridge
Jan. 30, 2020 ~3 min

Tags:  engineering  women-in-stem  space  astronomy

Space radar company chases persistent vision

The American start-up Capella says it's now ready to deploy its fleet of all-weather Earth observers.

By Jonathan Amos • bbcnews
Jan. 29, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: engineering astronomy space-exploration earth-observation

Study likens Earth’s evolution to creation of Frankenstein’s monster

The evolution of the first building blocks on Earth may have been messier than previously thought, likening it to the mishmash creation of Frankenstein’s monster.

Caitlin McDermott-Murphy • harvard
Jan. 28, 2020 ~4 min

Tags:  science-technology  engineering  dna  chemistry  genetics  basic-research  chemistry-and-chemical-biology  jack-szostak  origins-of-life  rna  science  caitlin-mcdermott-murphy  primordial-soup  prebiotic  seohyun-kim

Human body-on-chip platform may speed up drug development

Multiple human organ chips that quantitatively predict drug pharmacokinetics may offer alternatives to some animal tests.

Benjamin Boettner • harvard
Jan. 27, 2020 ~15 min

Tags:  science-technology  engineering  science  wyss-institute-for-biologically-inspired-engineering  drug-predictions  human-body-on-chip  organ-chip

Online hate speech could be contained like a computer virus, say researchers

Artificial intelligence is being developed that will allow advisory "quarantining" of hate speech in a manner akin to malware filters - offering users a way to control exposure to "hateful content" without resorting to censorship.

Cambridge University News • cambridge
Dec. 17, 2019 ~6 min

Tags:  engineering  social-media  algorithm  internet  freedom-of-speech

Smog-eating graphene composite reduces atmospheric pollution

An international group of scientists, including from the University of Cambridge, have developed a graphene composite that can ‘eat’ common atmospheric pollutants, and could be used as a coating on pavements or buildings.

Cambridge University News • cambridge
Dec. 5, 2019 ~6 min

Tags: engineering advanced-materials graphene environment pollution

Green-sky thinking for propulsion and power

A rapid way of turning ideas into new technologies in the aviation and power industries has been developed at Cambridge’s Whittle Laboratory. Here, Professor Rob Miller, Director of the Whittle, describes how researchers plan to scale the process to cover around 80% of the UK’s future aerodynamic technology needs.

Cambridge University News • cambridge
Dec. 4, 2019 ~7 min

Tags: engineering innovation sustainable-earth climate-change energy environment aircraft carbon-emissions

Green-sky thinking for propulsion and power

A rapid way of turning ideas into new technologies in the aviation and power industries has been developed at Cambridge’s Whittle Laboratory. Here, Professor Rob Miller, Director of the Whittle, describes how researchers plan to scale the process to cover around 80% of the UK’s future aerodynamic technology needs.

Cambridge University News • cambridge
Dec. 4, 2019 ~7 min

Tags: engineering innovation sustainable-earth climate-change energy environment aircraft carbon-emissions

Wind more effective than cold air at cooling rooms naturally

The effectiveness of non-mechanical, low-energy methods for moderating temperature and humidity has been evaluated in a series of experiments by researchers from the University of Cambridge.

Cambridge University News • cambridge
Nov. 20, 2019 ~5 min

Tags: engineering cities sustainability sustainable-earth climate-change heating cooling

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