COVID-19 and teletherapy may be changing how much you know about your therapist

With most therapy sessions now online, a psychologist explores whether more self-disclosure by therapists – sharing more about their own lives – might help their patients.

Adrienne Lapidos, Clinical Assistant Professor of Psychiatry, University of Michigan • conversation
July 1, 2020 ~9 min

Tags: health psychiatry covid-19 coronavirus psychology pandemic telehealth mental-illness therapy telemedicine covid-19-front-lines technology psychotherapy

COVID-19 messes with Texas: What went wrong, and what other states can learn as younger people get sick

Texas hospitals are filling up with new COVID-19 cases, and many of the people falling ill are young.

Tiffany A. Radcliff, Associate Dean for Research and Professor of Health Policy and Management, Texas A&M University • conversation
June 29, 2020 ~9 min

Tags: health public-health covid-19 coronavirus pandemic leadership social-distancing behavior texas

COVID-19 messes with Texas: What went wrong and how the state can turn it around

Texas hospitals are filling up with new COVID-19 cases, and many of the people falling ill are young.

Tiffany A. Radcliff, Associate Dean for Research and Professor of Health Policy and Management, Texas A&M University • conversation
June 29, 2020 ~9 min

Tags: health public-health covid-19 coronavirus pandemic leadership social-distancing behavior texas

New artificial heart valve could transform open-heart surgery

A new type of artificial heart valve, made of long-lived polymers, could mean that millions of patients with diseased heart valves will no longer require

Cambridge University News • cambridge
June 29, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: advanced-materials heart-disease health medicine animal-research heart

How to make your house and garden more tranquil – tips from an acoustics expert

Whether it's cars passing nearby, a neighbour's blaring music or the constant drone of a lawnmower, the trouble with sound is that – unlike light – it can be hard to block out completely.

Greg Watts, Professor of environmental acoustics, University of Bradford • conversation
June 29, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: health wellbeing gardens home noise house peace traffic-noise silence

How deforestation helps deadly viruses jump from animals to humans

Yellow fever, malaria and Ebola all spilled over from animals to humans at the edges of tropical forests. The new coronavirus is the latest zoonosis.

Maria Anice Mureb Sallum, Professor of Epidemiology, Universidade de São Paulo • conversation
June 25, 2020 ~11 min

Tags: health climate covid-19 coronavirus ebola pandemic malaria forests disease epidemics wildlife deforestation bats wildlife-trade monkeys mosquitoes yellow-fever zoonoses vectors carrying-capacity

Days with both extreme heat and extreme air pollution are becoming more common – which can't be a good thing for global health

In South Asia, days with both extreme heat and extreme pollution are expected to increase 175% by 2050. Separately, the health effects are bad; together they will likely be worse.

Xiaohui Xu, Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Texas A&M University • conversation
June 25, 2020 ~7 min

Tags: health climate-change pollution asthma models air-pollution heat india temperature lung-disease heatwave air-quality south-asia heatstroke

What doctors know about lingering symptoms of coronavirus

Is it possible that people who recover from COVID-19 will be plagued with long term side effects from the infection? An infectious disease physician reviews the evidence so far.

William Petri, Professor of Medicine, University of Virginia • conversation
June 24, 2020 ~7 min

Tags:  health  covid-19  coronavirus  pandemic  wuhan  sars-cov-2  delirium  coronavirus-2020  sars-cov  smell  taste  icu  pneumonia  acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome

Genomes front and centre of rare disease diagnosis

Cambridge-led study discovers new genetic causes of rare diseases, potentially leading to improved diagnosis and better patient care.

Cambridge University News • cambridge
June 24, 2020 ~7 min

Tags: dna health genome genome-sequencing rare-diseases

Rural America is more vulnerable to COVID-19 than cities are, and it's starting to show

Being able to identify communities that are susceptible to the pandemic ahead of time would allow officials to target public health interventions to slow the spread of the infection and avoid deaths.

David J. Peters, Associate Professor of Rural Sociology, Iowa State University • conversation
June 18, 2020 ~10 min

Tags: health covid-19 coronavirus livestock us-midwest rural mitigation slaughterhouses rural-policies

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