Happy the elephant was denied rights designed for humans – but the legal definition of 'person' is still evolving

Happy has lived alone in captivity for 14 years, but the New York Supreme Court recently denied a legal effort to rehome her.

Joshua Jowitt, Lecturer in Law, Newcastle University • conversation
Jan. 6, 2021 ~7 min

new-york human-rights elephant legal-personhood habeas-corpus legal-limbo

Thousands of ocean fishing boats could be using forced labor – we used AI and satellite data to find them

Forced labor is a widespread problem in fisheries on the high seas. Between 2012 and 2018, an estimated 100,000 people may have been victims of forced labor on thousands of different boats.

Gavin McDonald, Senior Project Researcher, University of California Santa Barbara • conversation
Dec. 21, 2020 ~8 min

machine-learning artificial-intelligence fisheries fishing human-rights satellite-data slavery forced-labor human-rights-violations

Children's climate change case at the European Court of Human Rights: what's at stake?

Six Portuguese youngsters say 33 countries have violated their human rights by causing climate change.

Sam Varvastian, PhD Researcher, Cardiff University • conversation
Dec. 4, 2020 ~7 min

climate-change human-rights portugal european-court-of-human-rights

In 20 big cities, police rules fall short of human rights law

A new report finds that, in 20 of the biggest cities in the United States, police use-of-force policies don't meet international human rights standards.

U. Chicago • futurity
June 18, 2020 ~8 min

cities united-states human-rights government featured society-and-culture violence laws police-departments

In America’s big cities, police rules fall short of human rights law

A new report finds that, in 20 of the biggest cities in the United States, police use-of-force policies don't meet international human rights standards.

U. Chicago • futurity
June 18, 2020 ~8 min

cities united-states human-rights government featured society-and-culture violence laws police-departments

How 'vaccine nationalism' could block vulnerable populations' access to COVID-19 vaccines

Should the US be able to pre-order vaccines for its citizens when other populations around the globe are at greater risk?

Ana Santos Rutschman, Assistant Professor of Law, Saint Louis University • conversation
June 17, 2020 ~10 min

public-health covid-19 coronavirus vaccines sars-cov-2 united-nations human-rights nationalism international-law gavi

How can the houseless fight the coronavirus? A community organization partners with academics to create a grassroots hand-washing infrastructure

A community effort is creating do-it-yourself hand-washing stations for the homeless population in Los Angeles.

Graham DiGuiseppi, Ph.D. student in the Department of Children, Youth and Families, USC Suzanne Dworak-Peck School of Social Work, University of Southern California • conversation
April 9, 2020 ~8 min

 covid-19  coronavirus  human-rights  homeless  solutions-journalism  diy  los-angeles  grassroots

Coronavirus: South Korea’s success in controlling disease is due to its acceptance of surveillance

South Korea's COVID-19 testing programme relies on what many would call privacy invasions.

Jung Won Sonn, Associate Professor in Urban Economic Development, UCL • conversation
March 19, 2020 ~7 min

 covid-19  coronavirus  south-korea  surveillance  human-rights  disease-prevention  covid-19-testing

How history can help us solve global economic issues | MIT News

MIT economic historian Anne McCants discusses the connection between innovation and opportunity.

School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences • mit
April 22, 2016 ~8 min

 poverty  development  history  economics  human-rights  innovation-and-entrepreneurship-ie  faculty  social-justice  shass  education-teaching-and-academics

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