Nearly two-thirds of older Black Americans can't afford to live alone without help – and it's even tougher for Latinos

Elder economic insecurity is a problem for all races, but it's far more common for people of color, particularly in certain states.

Jan Mutchler, Professor, Department of Gerontology, McCormack Graduate School Director, Center for Social and Demographic Research on Aging, Gerontology Institute, University of Massachusetts Boston • conversation
Nov. 17, 2020 ~8 min

health inequality aging income racism living-longer-2020 living-longer wealth affordability

We’ll see more fire seasons like 2020 - here’s a strategy for managing our nation’s flammable landscapes

A fire scientists offers a six-point strategy for preventing wildfires and living safely in flammable landscapes.

Jennifer Balch, Associate Professor of Geography and Director, Earth Lab, University of Colorado Boulder • conversation
Nov. 12, 2020 ~8 min

climate-change inequality forests california wildfires smoke wildfire-fighting colorado building-codes us-west fire-prevention smokey-bear

How 10 billion people could live well by 2050 – using as much energy as we did 60 years ago

Flattening inequality between and within countries could allow everyone a good standard of living within a liveable climate.

Joel Millward-Hopkins, Postdoctoral Researcher in Sustainability, University of Leeds • conversation
Oct. 5, 2020 ~7 min

climate-change energy automation energy-efficiency climate-action renewable-energy energy-consumption global-inequality

The urge to punish is not only about revenge – unfairness can unleash it, too

Unfairness alone is upsetting enough to drive people to punish lucky recipients of unfair outcomes.

Paul Deutchman, PhD Candidate in Psychology, Boston College • conversation
Sept. 30, 2020 ~6 min

morality psychology inequality competition motivation behavioral-economics evolutionary-psychology psychology-research fairness morals punishment justice deterrence stealing moral-outrage theft inequity social-inequity

Harvard journal keeps data scientists connected during COVID

Data science provides a foundation for an important front in the battle against COVID-19. The Harvard Data Science Review, a journal of the Harvard Data Science Initiative, is helping keep data scientists connected and up to date on the latest findings.

Alvin Powell • harvard
Sept. 18, 2020 ~21 min

science-technology covid-19 inequality data-science alvin-powell bias francesca-dominici harvard-data-science-initiative harvard-data-science-review xiao-li-meng

Top 1% of EU households have carbon footprints 22 times larger than climate targets allow

Our new research uncovered stark carbon inequality across the EU.

Richard Wood, Professor of Industrial Ecology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology • conversation
Aug. 27, 2020 ~7 min

carbon-emissions inequality carbon-footprint 15-degrees

How racism and classism affect natural ecosystems

Scientists find inequality between humans also harms the birds, the bees, the microbes and the trees.

Jake M. Robinson, PhD Researcher, Department of Landscape, University of Sheffield • conversation
Aug. 19, 2020 ~6 min

biodiversity inequality racism indigenous-people urban-ecology

Nature and nurture both contribute to gender inequality in leadership – but that doesn't mean patriarchy is forever

Recognizing the influence of evolution on behavior and gender norms suggests ways to reduce gender inequality in leadership in the real world.

Christopher von Rueden, Associate Professor of Leadership Studies, University of Richmond • conversation
Aug. 18, 2020 ~9 min

anthropology gender gender-inequality leadership human-evolutionary-biology social-norms competition gender-roles evolutionary-biology competitiveness patriarchy gender-norms womens-leadership

Fine-particle air pollution has decreased across the US, but poor and minority communities are still the most polluted

A new study shows that while fine particle air pollution has declined nationwide over the past 40 years, the health and environmental benefits haven't been shared evenly.

Jay Shimshack, Associate Professor of Public Policy and Economics, University of Virginia • conversation
July 30, 2020 ~9 min

public-health inequality air-pollution environmental-justice particulates us-environmental-protection-agency environmental-health us-environmental-policy monitoring

Random testing in Indiana shows COVID-19 is 6 times deadlier than flu, and 2.8% of the state has been infected

A team of researchers from Indiana University performed random testing for SARS-CoV-2 across the state. The results offer some of the most accurate data to date about important aspects of the virus.

Nir Menachemi, Professor of Health Policy and Management, Indiana University • conversation
July 21, 2020 ~11 min

health epidemiology public-health coronavirus inequality pandemic statistics sars-cov-2 testing random-sampling antibody-testing indiana rt-pcr covi-19 death-rate

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