Figs show that nonnative species can invade ecosystems by forming unexpected partnerships

As invasive species transform the world, frontline agencies take solace that species needing unique partners can’t invade alone. A new study on figs shows they may find new partners to invade anyway.

Jared Bernard, Ph.D. Candidate in Entomology, University of Hawaii • conversation
yesterday ~9 min

biology plants botany pollinators pollination introduced-species wasps invasive-species flowers native-species non-native-species

Goldenrod honey: misinformation is causing a biological invasion of this Canadian weed

Our study is the first to research the impact of online misinformation on biological invasions.

Johannes M H Knops, Professor & Head of Department Health and Environmental Sciences, Xi'an Jiaotong Liverpool University • conversation
Dec. 23, 2020 ~8 min

bees internet ecology misinformation interdisciplinarity honey invasive-species weeds

Fences have big effects on land and wildlife around the world that are rarely measured

Millions of miles of fences crisscross the Earth's surface. They divide ecosystems and affect wild species in ways that often are harmful, but are virtually unstudied.

Wenjing Xu, PhD Candidate in Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley • conversation
Nov. 30, 2020 ~10 min

africa ecology australia infrastructure wildlife livestock us-mexico-border-wall ecosystems roads habitat-fragmentation invasive-species predators us-west fences animal-migration

Invasive species: biggest threat may be the most uncertain – disease

The reality TV show I'm a Celebrity, Get Me Out Of Here is under fire for using non-native insects while filming in the Welsh countryside.

Amy Burgess, PhD Candidate in Invasion Biology, Teesside University • conversation
Nov. 26, 2020 ~6 min

insects disease uk-wildlife invasive-species spiders parasites crustaceans arthropods crayfish cockroaches

Wallabies are on the loose in Britain – and we've mapped 95 sightings

First imported by zoos, wallabies proved to be adept escape artists that can survive in the British countryside.

Holly English, PhD Researcher, Movement Ecology, University College Dublin • conversation
Nov. 3, 2020 ~6 min

invasive-species wallabies

Invasive species: why Britain can't eat its way out of its crayfish problem

We found that signal crayfish traps tend to catch larger males, letting the bulk of the population go free.

Eleri G. Pritchard, PhD Candidate in Freshwater Ecology, UCL • conversation
Oct. 13, 2020 ~6 min

biodiversity rivers endangered-species freshwater-biology invasive-species crustaceans

Biodiversity: where the world is making progress – and where it's not

The world missed all 20 targets for stemming the tide of biodiversity loss. But there has been some progress over the last decade.

Tom Oliver, Professor of Applied Ecology, University of Reading • conversation
Sept. 30, 2020 ~8 min

climate-change biodiversity extinction united-nations wildlife invasive-species habitat-loss species-loss unep convention-on-biodiversity

Invasive ticks are spreading without any males

All the adult Asian longhorned ticks found in the United States so far have been female. Here's why.

Todd Bates-Rutgers • futurity
July 9, 2020 ~5 min

insects genes invasive-species ticks parasites earth-and-environment

Invasive species threaten most protected areas across the world - new study

Our research investigated 900 'alien' species across almost 200,000 protected areas worldwide.

Tim Blackburn, Professor of Invasion Biology , UCL • conversation
June 8, 2020 ~6 min

wildlife-conservation invasive-species national-parks protected-areas conservation-biology

Parasitic worms in your shellfish lead a creepy but popular lifestyle

Mud blister worms make their homes in the shells of oysters and other shellfish, where they weaken their hosts.

Andrew David, Assistant Professor of Biology, Clarkson University • conversation
June 3, 2020 ~7 min

biology shellfish worms calcium-carbonate aquaculture food-webs ecosystems invasive-species parasites zoology scallops abalone larvae

/

3