500 whales stranded in Tasmania – indigenous elders are best guides to understanding this tragedy

It's time to listen to warnings from the people of the Pacific.

Niki JP Alsford, Professor in Asia Pacific Studies, Director of the Asia Pacific Studies Institutes, University of Central Lancashire • conversation
Oct. 2, 2020 ~5 min

Tags: marine-biology whales dolphins cetaceans marine-conservation tasmania pacific indigenous-knowledge whale-stranding maori-culture pacific-islanders

When hurricanes temporarily halt fishing, marine food webs recover quickly

Hurricane Harvey destroyed the fishing infrastructure of Aransas Bay and reduced fishing by 80% over the following year. This removed humans from the trophic cascade and whole food webs changed.

Joseph W. Reustle, SPIRE Postdoctoral Scholar, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill • conversation
Sept. 15, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: environment fish ecology hurricane fishing food-webs research-brief marine-biology ecosystems texas cyclones gulf-coast trophic-cascade oyster-reefs

Mauritius oil spill: Satellite images show removal operation

Satellite images capture tug boats trying to remove the broken vessel, which spilled tonnes of oil.

BBC Science News • bbcnews
Aug. 19, 2020 ~2 min

Tags: environment japan oil marine-biology ocean-pollution mauritius marine-conservation

Microplastic in Atlantic Ocean 'could weigh 21 million tonnes'

There are 12-21 million tonnes of tiny plastic fragments floating in the ocean, scientists say.

By Victoria Gill • bbcnews
Aug. 18, 2020 ~3 min

Tags: environment plastic plastic-pollution marine-biology atlantic-ocean

A rush is on to mine the deep seabed, with effects on ocean life that aren't well understood

Companies are eager to mine the deep ocean for valuable mineral deposits. But scientists are concerned about impacts on sea life, including creatures that haven't even been discovered yet.

Elizabeth Mendenhall, Assistant Professor of Marine Affairs and Political Science, University of Rhode Island • conversation
Aug. 17, 2020 ~9 min

Tags: mining minerals oceans marine-biology metals international-law clean-energy-future law-of-the-sea international-seabed-authority

The Moon and stars are a compass for nocturnal animals – but light pollution is leading them astray

Towns and cities create an orange glow on the horizon at night. It's so widespread that it even disturbs sea creatures.

Stuart Jenkins, Professor of Marine Ecology, Bangor University • conversation
Aug. 11, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: moon wildlife marine-biology stars milky-way light-pollution artificial-light night-sky coastal-areas

Abandoned fibreglass boats are releasing toxins and microplastics across the world

Too many small yachts and speedboats are simply being abandoned to shed toxins and microplastics into the sea.

Corina Ciocan, Senior Lecturer in Marine Biology, University of Brighton • conversation
Aug. 4, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: plastic-pollution marine-biology ships microplastic boats

Microplastics: tiny crustaceans can fragment them into even smaller nanoplastics

The discovery that such a common animal can rapidly produce vast numbers of nanoplastics is particularly worrying.

Alicia Mateos Cárdenas, Postdoctoral Researcher, University College Cork • conversation
July 31, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: microplastics marine-biology freshwater-biology microplastic crustaceans

We discovered a new species, but war means it may now remain hidden forever

The extraordinary story of a stingray, its discovery and its uncertain fate in the Yemen war.

Alec Moore, Post-Doctoral Fisheries Scientist, Bangor University • conversation
July 23, 2020 ~6 min

Tags:  biodiversity  biology  war  new-species  marine-biology  species  yemen  stingrays

Scientists shed light on how the blackest fish in the sea 'disappear'

Experts have shed light on the mystery of how the blackest fish in the deep sea are camouflaged.

By Victoria Gill • bbcnews
July 17, 2020 ~3 min

Tags: animals marine-biology

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