Rhythm and bleughs: how changes in our stomach’s rhythms steer us away from disgusting sights

Does the sight of maggots squirming in rotten food make you look away in disgust? The phrase ‘makes my stomach turn’ takes on a new meaning today as

Cambridge University News • cambridge
Nov. 24, 2020 ~6 min

spotlight-on-neuroscience neuroscience


A hunger for social contact

Neuroscientists find that isolation provokes brain activity similar to that seen during hunger cravings.

Anne Trafton | MIT News Office • mit
Nov. 23, 2020 ~8 min

neuroscience mental-health covid-19 pandemic research school-of-science brain-and-cognitive-sciences national-institutes-of-health-nih mcgovern-institute

Technique to regenerate the optic nerve offers hope for future glaucoma treatment

Scientists have used gene therapy to regenerate damaged nerve fibres in the eye, in a discovery that could aid the development of new treatments for glaucoma,

Cambridge University News • cambridge
Nov. 5, 2020 ~5 min

spotlight-on-neuroscience spotlight-on-future-therapeutics neuroscience eyesight eye glaucoma

Researchers show how to target a 'shape-shifting' protein in Alzheimer’s disease

A new study suggests that it is possible to design drugs that can target a type of shape-shifting protein involved in Alzheimer’s disease, which was previously

Cambridge University News • cambridge
Nov. 4, 2020 ~5 min

alzheimers-disease brain neuroscience dementia ageing

Why it takes guts to protect the brain against infection

The brain is uniquely protected against invading bacteria and viruses, but its defence mechanism has long remained a mystery. Now, a study in mice, confirmed

Cambridge University News • cambridge
Nov. 4, 2020 ~5 min

spotlight-on-neuroscience infectious-diseases animal-research neuroscience immunology

Scientists identify specific brain region and circuits controlling attention

Norepinephrine-producing neurons in the locus coeruleus produce attention focus, impulse control via two distinct connections to prefrontal cortex.

David Orenstein | Picower Institute for Learning and Memory • mit
Nov. 3, 2020 ~8 min

neuroscience anxiety biology optogenetics research behavior school-of-science brain-and-cognitive-sciences picower-institute

Why our obsession with happy endings can lead to bad decisions

Shakespeare was wrong when he wrote 'all's well that ends well'.

Martin D. Vestergaard, Computational Neuroscientist, University of Cambridge • conversation
Nov. 2, 2020 ~7 min

brain neuroscience gambling psychology happiness cognitive-bias

Age and pre-existing conditions increase risk of stroke among COVID-19 patients

Fourteen out of every 1,000 COVID-19 patients admitted to hospital experience a stroke, a rate that is even higher in older patients and those with severe

Cambridge University News • cambridge
Oct. 28, 2020 ~6 min

spotlight-on-neuroscience stroke brain neuroscience covid-19 coronavirus

How a worm may yield insights into the gut-brain relationship

Gurrein Madan, brain and cognitive sciences graduate student and MathWorks Fellow, studies gut–brain signaling with implications for human health.

Alison Gold | School of Science • mit
Oct. 27, 2020 ~6 min

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