How the Texas electricity system produced low-cost power but left residents out in the cold

The Texas electric power market is designed to give energy companies incentive to sell electricity at the lowest possible cost. That focus helps explain why it collapsed during a historic cold wave.

Theodore J. Kury, Director of Energy Studies, University of Florida • conversation
Feb. 18, 2021 ~9 min

Citizen scientists are filling research gaps created by the pandemic

COVID-19 kept many scientists from doing field research in 2020, which means that important records will have data gaps. But volunteers are helping to plug some of those holes.

Kathleen Prudic, Assistant Professor of Citizen and Data Science, University of Arizona • conversation
Feb. 3, 2021 ~10 min

What is food insecurity?

A food policy researcher helps make sense of the lexicon of US food policy terms, and explains how they relate to racial justice.

Caitlin Caspi, Professor of Public Health, University of Connecticut • conversation
Feb. 2, 2021 ~8 min

4 signs that food pantries improve the diets of low-income people

The boxes and bags people get from food pantries contain healthier food than you might suspect.

Heather Eicher-Miller, Associate Professor of Nutrition Science, Purdue University • conversation
Dec. 17, 2020 ~6 min

A hospital that prescribes free nutritious food to families who need more than medical care

Dayton Children’s Hospital has begun to screen patients and their families for food insecurity, referring many of them to its 'Food Pharm.'

Diana Cuy Castellanos, Assistant Professor of Dietetics and Nutrition, University of Dayton • conversation
Dec. 14, 2020 ~3 min

Buying a coronavirus vaccine for everyone on earth, storing and shipping it, and giving it safely will all be hard and expensive

Side agreements signed by some wealthy nations threaten to undercut global efforts to ensure a fairly equitable worldwide vaccination effort.

Nicole Hassoun, Professor of Philosophy, Binghamton University, State University of New York • conversation
Nov. 10, 2020 ~8 min

The pitfalls of hospitals seeking donations from their rich patients

A survey suggests that most Americans feel that discussions about charitable support may interfere with the relationship between doctors and their patients.

Reshma Jagsi, Deputy Chair of Radiation Oncology and Director of the Center for Bioethics and Social Sciences in Medicine, University of Michigan • conversation
Nov. 2, 2020 ~4 min

OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma may settle legal claims with a new 'public trust' that would still be dedicated to profit

The government has tried to harness profit-driven drugmaking to serve public health before. The results were underwhelming.

David Herzberg, Associate Professor of History, University at Buffalo • conversation
Oct. 21, 2020 ~10 min

How a government-linked foundation could speed the spread of new clean-energy technologies

Similar arrangements already support the National Park Service, the National Institutes of Health and other federal agencies.

David M. Hart, Professor of Public Policy, George Mason University • conversation
Oct. 7, 2020 ~9 min

Science elicits hope in Americans – its positive brand doesn't need to be partisan

When you ask Americans what the word 'science' brings to mind, a majority respond 'hope.' Using this built-in brand can help communicate important science messages.

Todd Newman, Assistant Professor of Life Sciences Communication, University of Wisconsin-Madison • conversation
July 23, 2020 ~8 min

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