Sick of COVID-19? Here's why you might have pandemic fatigue

It's draining and depressing to stay on high alert month after month after month. Understanding pandemic fatigue better might help you strengthen your resolve.

Jay Maddock, Professor of Public Health, Texas A&M University • conversation
Oct. 23, 2020 ~8 min

Tags: public-health covid-19 coronavirus psychology handwashing social-distancing social-norms reopening loneliness social-isolation face-masks masks health-behaviors wearing-masks preventive-health effects-of-social-distancing loneliness-and-social-distancing reopening-after-social-distancing coronavirus-and-handwashing business-reopenings covid-19-prevention

How to stay socially connected as lockdown returns - according to science

Recent findings from social neuroscience show us how we can make virtual interactions almost as beneficial as real world ones.

Philip J. Cozzolino, Lecturer in Social Psychology, University of Essex • conversation
Oct. 22, 2020 ~7 min

Tags: neuroscience covid-19 coronavirus psychology loneliness video-calls social-interaction

When fracking moves into the neighborhood, mental health risks rise

Living near oil and gas production can affect mental health, driving stress and feelings of depression.

Stephanie Malin, Associate Professor of Sociology; Co-Founder and Steering Committee Member, Center for Environmental Justice at CSU, Colorado State University • conversation
Oct. 22, 2020 ~8 min

Tags: health mental-health psychology stress oil environmental-health sociology natural-gas colorado fracking hydraulic-fracturing

Research shows lullabies in any language relax babies

Researchers at Harvard’s Music Lab have determined that American infants relaxed when played lullabies that were unfamiliar and in a foreign language.

Manisha Aggarwal-Schifellite • harvard
Oct. 19, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: science-technology psychology fas music-lab samuel-mehr connie-bainbridge mila-bertolo nature-human-behaviour

How we discovered that VR can profile your personality

How much does your virtual reality headset know about your life?

Stephen Fairclough, Professor of Psychophysiology in the School of Psychology, Liverpool John Moores University • conversation
Oct. 15, 2020 ~5 min

Tags: virtual-reality anxiety psychology stress data-privacy personality neuroticism vr cambridge-analytica

The urge to punish is not only about revenge – unfairness can unleash it, too

Unfairness alone is upsetting enough to drive people to punish lucky recipients of unfair outcomes.

Paul Deutchman, PhD Candidate in Psychology, Boston College • conversation
Sept. 30, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: morality psychology inequality competition motivation behavioral-economics evolutionary-psychology psychology-research fairness morals punishment justice deterrence stealing moral-outrage theft inequity social-inequity

Microaggressions aren't just innocent blunders – new research links them with racial bias

White people are often defensive when they're called out for these subtle snubs and insults. But researchers have found that microaggressions correlate with racial bias.

Jonathan Kanter, Director of the Center for the Science of Social Connection, University of Washington • conversation
Sept. 24, 2020 ~9 min

Tags: psychology bias race racism psychology-research racial-injustice microaggression racial-bias microaggressions racial-prejudice

Routine: less is often more when it comes to children's development

Rigid rules could stifle creativity in children.

Debbie Pope, Lecturer in Psychology, University of Central Lancashire • conversation
Sept. 23, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: psychology child-development creativity

3 research-based ways to cope with the uncertainties of pandemic life

Feel like you're facing too many pandemic-related unknowns? Reframing what it means to not know can help you break the uncertainty-anxiety connection.

Bethany Teachman, Professor of Psychology, University of Virginia • conversation
Sept. 22, 2020 ~7 min

Tags: mental-health covid-19 coronavirus anxiety psychology uncertainty cognitive-behavioral-therapy worry coronavirus-anxiety mindset

American society teaches everyone to be racist – but you can rewrite subconscious stereotypes

If you’re American – regardless of the color of your skin – racism structures how you think. Changing the system should change these implicit biases.

R. Nathan Pipitone, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Florida Gulf Coast University • conversation
Sept. 17, 2020 ~10 min

Tags: psychology implicit-bias racism police-shootings police-shootings-of-black-men decision-making implicit-association-test racial-stereotypes cultural-bias stereotype

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