Video: Who should get a COVID-19 vaccine first?

A bioethicist explains a recent report that recommends how to distribute a COVID-19 vaccine equitably.

Nicole Hassoun, Professor of Philosophy, Binghamton University, State University of New York • conversation
Sept. 18, 2020 ~8 min

Tags:  public-health  covid-19  coronavirus  vaccines  patents  big-pharma

Rapid test for Covid-19 shows improved sensitivity

A CRISPR-based test developed at MIT and the Broad Institute can detect nearly as many cases as the standard Covid-19 diagnostic.

Anne Trafton | MIT News Office • mit
Sept. 17, 2020 ~5 min

Tags: medicine crispr public-health covid-19 pandemic broad-institute viruses research school-of-engineering school-of-science brain-and-cognitive-sciences biological-engineering mcgovern-institute

Coping with Western wildfires: 5 essential reads

How climate change and other human actions have combined to create conditions for explosive wildfires in California, Oregon and Washington state.

Jennifer Weeks, Environment + Energy Editor, The Conversation • conversation
Sept. 10, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: public-health climate-change risk california-wildfires insurance california wildfires oregon land-use wood-smoke essential-reads washington-state

Dangerous bacteria is showing up in school water systems, reminding all buildings reopening amid COVID-19 to check the pipes

When water stagnates in pipes, harmful metals and bacteria can accumulate and make people sick. Buildings that were shut down for weeks during the pandemic may be at risk.

Andrew J. Whelton, Associate Professor of Civil, Environmental & Ecological Engineering, Purdue University • conversation
Sept. 8, 2020 ~8 min

Tags: health children public-health bacteria covid-19 coronavirus schools pandemic water coronavirus-2020 viruses buildings legionella legionnaires-disease plumbing

Several schools find harmful bacteria in water systems, reminding all reopening buildings to check the pipes

When water stagnates in pipes, harmful metals and bacteria can accumulate and make people sick. Buildings that were shut down for weeks during the pandemic may be at risk.

Andrew J. Whelton, Associate Professor of Civil, Environmental & Ecological Engineering, Purdue University • conversation
Sept. 8, 2020 ~8 min

Tags: health children public-health bacteria covid-19 coronavirus schools pandemic water coronavirus-2020 viruses buildings legionella legionnaires-disease plumbing

A new way to make bacteria more sensitive to antibiotics

SMART researchers find exposing bacteria to hydrogen sulfide can increase antimicrobial sensitivity in bacteria that do not produce H2S.

Singapore-MIT Alliance for Research and Technology • mit
Sept. 3, 2020 ~4 min

Tags: health medicine public-health bacteria health-care antibiotics pharmaceuticals research school-of-engineering biological-engineering bioengineering-and-biotechnology singapore-mit-alliance-for-research-and-technology-smart

Malaria: new map shows which areas will be at risk because of global warming

We modelled surface water across Africa to show which parts of the continent are climatically-suitable for malaria – and how this will change.

Chris Thomas, Global Professor in Water & Planetary Health, University of Lincoln • conversation
Aug. 28, 2020 ~8 min

Tags: public-health climate-change malaria malaria-control malaria-in-africa hydrological-cycle

Heatwaves are an invisible killer – and the UK is woefully unprepared

Extreme heat could kill 5,000 people each year in the UK by the 2050s.

Chloe Brimicombe, PhD Candidate in Climate Change and Health, University of Reading • conversation
Aug. 20, 2020 ~6 min

Tags: public-health climate-change public-health-england heatwave extreme-heat overheating climate-change-and-health

Q&A: Peter Fisher discusses JASON report on reopening university laboratories

MIT physicist led government-backed effort to study the challenges and solutions surrounding campus lab work.

Peter Dizikes | MIT News Office • mit
July 30, 2020 ~7 min

Tags: physics public-health covid-19 pandemic disease research community school-of-science faculty

Fine-particle air pollution has decreased across the US, but poor and minority communities are still the most polluted

A new study shows that while fine particle air pollution has declined nationwide over the past 40 years, the health and environmental benefits haven't been shared evenly.

Jay Shimshack, Associate Professor of Public Policy and Economics, University of Virginia • conversation
July 30, 2020 ~9 min

Tags: public-health inequality air-pollution environmental-justice particulates us-environmental-protection-agency environmental-health us-environmental-policy monitoring

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