Rural hospitals are under siege from COVID-19 – here's what doctors are facing, in their own words

Hospitals are losing staff to quarantines as rural case numbers rise, and administrators fear flu season will make make it worse. And then there's the politics.

Lauren Hughes, Physician, Associate Professor of Family Medicine, University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus • conversation
Nov. 20, 2020 ~9 min

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How to use COVID-19 testing and quarantining to safely travel for the holidays

Over the approachin holidays, people around the world will want to travel to see friends and family. Getting tested for the coronavirus can make this safer, but testing alone is not a perfect answer.

Claudia Finkelstein, Associate Professor of Family Medicine, Michigan State University • conversation
Oct. 23, 2020 ~8 min

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History tells us trying to stop diseases like COVID-19 at the border is a failed strategy

The US response to the coronavirus was slow and problematic, but it also was rooted in a 19th-century way of viewing public health.

Charles McCoy, Assistant Professor of Sociology, SUNY Plattsburgh • conversation
Aug. 28, 2020 ~8 min

infectious-diseases covid-19 coronavirus pandemic quarantine outbreak epidemics cdc disease-control yellow-fever

Lessons from the 1918 pandemic: A U.S. city's past may hold clues

How politicians and the public in Denver, Colorado handled the 1918 flu epidemic is relevant to today.

J. Alexander Navarro, Professor of History of Medicine, University of Michigan • conversation
July 6, 2020 ~7 min

 influenza  covid-19  coronavirus  pandemic  quarantine  spanish-flu  1918-flu-pandemic  1918-spanish-flu

5 ways the world is better off dealing with a pandemic now than in 1918

A century ago, the influenza pandemic killed about 50 million people. Today we are battling the coronavirus pandemic. Are we any better off? Two social scientists share five reasons we have to be optimistic.

Eva Kassens-Noor, Associate Professor, Urban & Regional Planning Program and Global Urban Studies Program, Michigan State University • conversation
June 19, 2020 ~9 min

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We may be safer now from coronavirus than we were three months ago, but we're not totally safe

If coronavirus is still circulating, why are we safer now that social distancing measures have been relaxed? A public health expert explains.

Ryan Malosh, Assistant Research Scientist, University of Michigan • conversation
June 4, 2020 ~6 min

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It is safe to go to a pool, the beach or a park? A doctor offers guidance as coronavirus distancing measures lifted

Without clear guidelines from states or the feds on how to stay safe after reopening, it's hard to know what to do. A doctor suggests things to consider in a park, at the beach and the pool.

Claudia Finkelstein, Associate Professor of Family Medicine, Michigan State University • conversation
May 20, 2020 ~7 min

 covid-19  quarantine  handwashing  social-distancing  coronavirus-2020

How can you be safe at a pool, the beach or a park? A doctor offers guidance as coronavirus distancing measures lifted

Without clear guidelines from states or the feds on how to stay safe after reopening, it's hard to know what to do. A doctor suggests things to consider in a park, at the beach and the pool.

Claudia Finkelstein, Associate Professor of Family Medicine, Michigan State University • conversation
May 20, 2020 ~7 min

 covid-19  quarantine  handwashing  social-distancing  coronavirus-2020

What every new baker should know about the yeast all around us

Yeast is a single-celled organism that's everywhere around us. Understanding how yeast works can help you make better bread and appreciate this old friend of humanity.

Jeffrey Miller, Associate Professor, Hospitality Management, Colorado State University • conversation
May 11, 2020 ~7 min

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Finding ways to move your body while social distancing

Physical activity is important for all kinds of health reasons, even in quarantine.

Renee J. Rogers, Associate Professor of Health and Physical Activity - Programming Director, Pitt Healthy Lifestyle Institute, University of Pittsburgh • conversation
May 8, 2020 ~4 min

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