PFAS 'forever chemicals' are widespread and threaten human health – here's a strategy for protecting the public

PFAS chemicals are toxic, widespread and persistent in the environment, and the federal government has been slow to regulate them. A scientist explains why evaluating them one by one isn't working.

Carol Kwiatkowski, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences, North Carolina State University • conversation
Oct. 9, 2020 ~9 min

Looser standards for showerheads could send a lot of water and money down the drain

The Trump administration is trying to roll back a regulation that requires showerheads to conserve water and saves owners an average of $70 and nearly 3,000 gallons of water yearly per showerhead.

Robert Glennon, Regents Professor and Morris K. Udall Professor of Law & Public Policy, University of Arizona • conversation
Sept. 2, 2020 ~8 min

Cyberspace is critical infrastructure – it will take effective government oversight to make it safe

Self-regulation by the technology industry has failed to keep people safe online. That's a job for government.

Francine Berman, Hamilton Distinguished Professor of Computer Science, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute • conversation
Aug. 10, 2020 ~8 min

Routine gas flaring is wasteful, polluting and undermeasured

Flaring, or burning, waste gas from energy production has sharply increased over the past decade. It wastes usable fuel, pollutes the air, and helps drive climate change.

Gunnar W. Schade, Associate Professor of Atmospheric Sciences, Texas A&M University • conversation
July 29, 2020 ~9 min

More people eat frog legs than you think – and humans are harvesting frogs at unsustainable rates

Frogs are harvested as food by the millions every year. A new study shows that uncontrolled frog hunting could drive some populations to extinction by midcentury.

Kerim Çiçek, Associate Professor of Zoology, Ege University • conversation
June 12, 2020 ~8 min

Environmental regulations likely to be first casualties in post-pandemic recovery

As governments race to revive economic growth, expect a bonfire of green tape.

Meinhard Doelle, Professor of Law, Dalhousie University • conversation
May 14, 2020 ~6 min

Both conservatives and liberals want a green energy future, but for different reasons

How should the United States power its economy in 2050? A recent survey finds surprising agreement from Americans of all political stripes.

Shahzeen Attari, Associate Professor of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University • conversation
May 5, 2020 ~9 min

EPA decides to reject the latest science, endanger public health and ignore the law by keeping an outdated fine particle air pollution standard

After a 5-year review, the EPA is leaving US standards for fine particle air pollution unchanged, even though recent studies suggest that tightening them could save thousands of lives yearly.

H. Christopher Frey, Glenn E. Futrell Distinguished University Professor of Environmental Engineering, North Carolina State University • conversation
May 1, 2020 ~9 min

BP paid a steep price for the Gulf oil spill but for the US a decade later, it's business as usual

The Deepwater Horizon disaster set new records for holding polluters to account. But it had much less impact on laws regulating offshore drilling or US oil dependence.

David M. Uhlmann, Jeffrey F. Liss Professor from Practice and Director, Environmental Law and Policy Program, University of Michigan • conversation
April 23, 2020 ~8 min

Ventilators: why it is so hard to produce what's needed to tackle coronavirus

It's not as simple as churning out more products, though that's a good starting point.

Peter Ogrodnik, Professor of Medical Devices Design, Keele University • conversation
April 9, 2020 ~7 min

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