Biden has a congressional shortcut to cancel Trump’s regulatory rollbacks, but it comes with risks

The Trump administration used this shortcut liberally in 2017, but its potential pitfalls and impact raise a question: Should Congress repeal it?

Daniel Farber, Professor of Law, University of California, Berkeley • conversation
Jan. 18, 2021 ~7 min

 policy  donald-trump  joe-biden  us-congress  regulation  fossil-fuel-industry

Biden plans to fight climate change in a way no U.S. president has done before

Former Colorado Gov. Bill Ritter explains how the new administration can mobilize all parts of his government as it faces five big climate challenges.

Bill Ritter Jr., Director, Center for the New Energy Economy, Colorado State University • conversation
Jan. 12, 2021 ~9 min

climate-change energy environment electricity electric-vehicles joe-biden regulations colorado clean-energy climate-policy john-kerry biden-administration

Cambridge launches Regulatory Genome Project

The project will use machine learning to sequence the world’s regulatory text and create an open-source repository of machine-readable regulatory information. 

Cambridge University News • cambridge
Dec. 21, 2020 ~3 min

machine-learning finance artificial-intelligence regulation alternative-finance

5 years after Paris: How countries’ climate policies match up to their promises, and who's aiming for net zero emissions

Bold visions for slowing global warming have emerged from all over the world. What's not clear is how countries will meet them.

Dolf Gielen, Payne Institute Fellow, Colorado School of Mines • conversation
Dec. 10, 2020 ~9 min

climate-change carbon-emissions policy global-warming regulation paris-climate-agreement greenhouse-gas-emissions paris-agreement paris-climate-talks un-paris-agreement

On environmental protection, Biden's election will mean a 180-degree turn from Trump policies

The Trump administration has used executive orders, deregulation and delays to reduce environmental regulation. Biden administration officials will use many of the same tools to undo their work.

Janet McCabe, Professor of Practice of Law, Indiana University • conversation
Nov. 12, 2020 ~6 min

donald-trump air-pollution water-pollution environmental-justice joe-biden donald-trump-administration regulation us-environmental-protection-agency clean-air-act clean-water-act cost-benefit-analysis us-environmental-policy 2020-us-elections science-advice executive-orders

Delinquent electric bills from the pandemic are coming due – who will pay them?

Many Americans have been unable to pay their electric bills during the COVID-19 pandemic, racking up billions of dollars in delinquent bills. Where will the money come from?

Theodore J. Kury, Director of Energy Studies, University of Florida • conversation
Nov. 6, 2020 ~9 min

finance energy electricity regulation covid-19-pandemic consumers debt electric-utilities bonds consumer-protection debt-collection public-utility securities-markets

How tech firms have tried to stop disinformation and voter intimidation – and come up short

The major social media firms have taken a largely piecemeal and fractured approach to managing the problem.

Scott Shackelford, Associate Professor of Business Law and Ethics; Executive Director, Ostrom Workshop; Cybersecurity Program Chair, IU-Bloomington, Indiana University • conversation
Nov. 2, 2020 ~9 min

social-media twitter google facebook disinformation regulations elections 2020-us-elections political-ads us-presidential-election voter-intimidation

There is a revolving door between industry and regulators, but does that really make for a 'cosy relationship'?

People often leave industry watchdogs to work for the very companies they were previously regulating.

Eva Heims, Lecturer in Public Policy, University of York • conversation
Oct. 30, 2020 ~6 min

regulation environment-agency regulators corporate-power

There's a 'revolving door' between industry and regulators, but its effects aren't as strong as you think

People often leave industry watchdogs to work for the very companies they were previously regulating.

Eva Heims, Lecturer in Public Policy, University of York • conversation
Oct. 30, 2020 ~6 min

regulation environment-agency regulators corporate-power

PFAS 'forever chemicals' are widespread and threaten human health – here's a strategy for protecting the public

PFAS chemicals are toxic, widespread and persistent in the environment, and the federal government has been slow to regulate them. A scientist explains why evaluating them one by one isn't working.

Carol Kwiatkowski, Adjunct Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences, North Carolina State University • conversation
Oct. 9, 2020 ~9 min

cancer pollution water-pollution regulation us-environmental-protection-agency environmental-health pfas teflon pfoa dupont

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