Fungal microbiome: Whether mice get fatter or thinner depends on the fungi that live in their gut

Fungi are a small but important part of the gut microbiome. A new study in mice shows that how much weight mice gain on a processed food diet depends on this fungal microbiome.

Justin D. Stewart, PhD Candidate in Evolutionary Biology, Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam • conversation
March 5, 2021 ~5 min

What's really driving coal power's demise?

Contrary to popular belief, falling natural gas prices didn't accelerate coal power plant retirements. Here's what did.

Jeffrey York, Associate Professor of Strategy and Entrepreneurship, University of Colorado Boulder • conversation
March 1, 2021 ~6 min

Air filters can scrub out pollutants near highways, reduce blood pressure

Living next to a highway is not great for health, but a new study shows that running air filters indoors can remove tiny particles of pollution and lower blood pressure.

Doug Brugge, Professor and Chair of Public Health Science and Community Medicine, University of Connecticut • conversation
Feb. 18, 2021 ~5 min

Thawing permafrost is full of ice-forming particles that could get into atmosphere

New research shows that permafrost contains huge amounts of particles that make it easier for cloud moisture to freeze. Thawing permafrost is releasing these ice-nucleating particles.

Thomas Hill, Research Scientist, Colorado State University • conversation
Jan. 28, 2021 ~6 min

Invasive tawny crazy ants have an intense craving for calcium – with implications for their spread in the US

The spread of tawny crazy ants may be driven, in part, by their need for calcium.

Ryan Reihart, Teaching Assistant and Ph.D. Candidate of Ecology, University of Dayton • conversation
Jan. 21, 2021 ~5 min

Some kindergartners are more likely to be heavy users of online tech later, according to new research

Too much screen time doesn't leave enough time for other important parts of growing up. Predicting which little kids will likely grow into heavy tech users could help target educational campaigns.

Paul L. Morgan, Eberly Fellow, Professor Education and Demography, and Director of the Center for Educational Disparities Research, Penn State • conversation
Jan. 12, 2021 ~7 min

Some kindergartners are more likely later to be heavy users of online tech, according to new research

Too much screen time doesn't leave enough time for other important parts of growing up. Predicting which little kids will likely grow into heavy tech users could help target educational campaigns.

Paul L. Morgan, Eberly Fellow, Professor Education and Demography, and Director of the Center for Educational Disparities Research, Penn State • conversation
Jan. 12, 2021 ~7 min

Curved origami offers a creative route to making robots and other mechanical devices

Curved origami isn't just elegant art. It's also a versatile way to vary the amount of force applied by robots and other machines.

Zirui Zhai, Ph.D. student in Mechanical Engineering, Arizona State University • conversation
Nov. 18, 2020 ~5 min

Racial discrimination ages Black Americans faster, according to a 25-year-long study of families

A study of 800 Black American families shows early experiences of racism have long-term consequences for physical and mental health.

Sierra Carter, Assistant Professor of Psychology, Georgia State University • conversation
Nov. 17, 2020 ~5 min

When scientific journals take sides during an election, the public's trust in science takes a hit

When the scientific establishment gets involved in partisan politics, surveys suggest, there are unintended consequences – especially for conservatives.

Stylianos Syropoulos, PhD Student in Psychological and Brain Sciences, University of Massachusetts Amherst • conversation
Nov. 12, 2020 ~6 min

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